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I recently ran into reentrancy issues with KVO. To visualize the problem, I would like to show a minimal example. Consider the interface of an AppDelegate class

@interface AppDelegate : UIResponder <UIApplicationDelegate>
@property (strong, nonatomic) UIWindow *window;
@property (nonatomic) int x;
@end

as well as its implementation

@implementation AppDelegate

- (BOOL)          application:(__unused UIApplication *)application
didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(__unused NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    __unused BigBugSource *b = [[BigBugSource alloc] initWithAppDelegate:self];

    self.x = 42;
    NSLog(@"%d", self.x);

   return YES;
}

@end

Unexpectedly, this program prints 43 to the console.

Here's why:

@interface BigBugSource : NSObject {
    AppDelegate *appDelegate;
}
@end

@implementation BigBugSource

- (id)initWithAppDelegate:(AppDelegate *)anAppDelegate
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        appDelegate = anAppDelegate;
        [anAppDelegate addObserver:self 
                        forKeyPath:@"x" 
                           options:NSKeyValueObservingOptionNew 
                           context:nil];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void)dealloc
{
    [appDelegate removeObserver:self forKeyPath:@"x"];
}

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(__unused NSString *)keyPath
                      ofObject:(__unused id)object
                        change:(__unused NSDictionary *)change
                       context:(__unused void *)context
{
    if (appDelegate.x == 42) {
        appDelegate.x++;
    }
}

@end

As you see, some different class (that may be in third-party code you do not have access to) may register an invisible observer to a property. This observer is then called synchronously, whenever the property's value has changed.

Because the call happens during the execution of another function, this introduces all sort of concurrency / multithreading bugs although the program runs on a single thread. Worse, the change happens without an explicit notice in the client-code (OK, you could expect that concurrency issues arise whenever you set a property...).

What is the best practice to solve this problem in Objective-C?

  • Is there some common solution to regain run-to-completion semantics automatically, meaning that KVO-Observation messages go through an event-queue, AFTER the current method finishes executing and invariants / postconditions are restored?

  • Not exposing any properties?

  • Guarding every critical function of an object with a boolean variable to ensure that reentrancy is not possible? For example: assert(!opInProgress); opInProgress = YES; at the beginning of the methods, and opInProgress = NO; at the end of the methods. This would at least reveal those kind of bugs directly during runtime.

  • Or is it possible to opt out of KVO somehow?

Update

Based on the answer by CRD, here is the updated code:

BigBugSource

- (void)observeValueForKeyPath:(__unused NSString *)keyPath
                      ofObject:(__unused id)object
                        change:(__unused NSDictionary *)change
                       context:(__unused void *)context
{
    if (appDelegate.x == 42) {
        [appDelegate willChangeValueForKey:@"x"]; // << Easily forgotten
        appDelegate.x++;                          // Also requires knowledge of
        [appDelegate didChangeValueForKey:@"x"];  // whether or not appDelegate  
    }                                             // has automatic notifications
}

AppDelegate

+ (BOOL)automaticallyNotifiesObserversForKey:(NSString *)key
{
    if ([key isEqualToString:@"x"]) {
        return NO;
    } else {
        return [super automaticallyNotifiesObserversForKey:key];
    }
}

- (BOOL)          application:(__unused UIApplication *)application
didFinishLaunchingWithOptions:(__unused NSDictionary *)launchOptions
{
    __unused BigBugSource *b = [[BigBugSource alloc] initWithAppDelegate:self];

    [self willChangeValueForKey:@"x"];
    self.x = 42;
    NSLog(@"%d", self.x);    // now prints 42 correctly
    [self didChangeValueForKey:@"x"];
    NSLog(@"%d", self.x);    // prints 43, that's ok because one can assume that
                             // state changes after a "didChangeValueForKey"
    return YES;
}
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

What you are asking for is manual change notification and is supported by KVO. It is a three stage process:

  1. Your class overrides + (BOOL)automaticallyNotifiesObserversForKey:(NSString *)theKey returning NO for any property you wish to defer notifications for and deferring to super otherwise;
  2. Before changing a property you call [self willChangeValueForKey:key]; and
  3. When you are ready for the notification to occur you call [self didChangeValueForKey:key]

You can build on this protocol quite easily, e.g. it is easy to keep a record of keys you have changed and trigger them all before you exit.

You can also use willChangeValueForKey: and didChangeValueForKey with automatic notifications turned on if you directly alter the backing variable of a property and need to trigger KVO.

The process along with an examples is described in Apple's documentation.

share|improve this answer
    
This improves the situation already. However, there are still issues. Consider a situation where you have a class that is part of a third-party library and that uses automatic notifications. When you change a property of an instance of this class, reentrancy problems arise again if another object has registered itself as an observer. The second problem is that you also have to call willChange and didChange if you change a property from outside, making code error-prone because it is easily forgotten. Is there no solution for this that truly supports run-to-completion semantics? –  Etan Aug 8 '12 at 8:31
    
@Etan - for third-party code you really have to leave it to them to behave as they see fit. For your code with a little work you can hold notifications for a particular class until you release them - turning off automatic notifications and adding will/didChange to your setters gets you back to the equivalent of automatic notification; however if you now add a flag (use a property, say 1holdNotifications`, to (un)set it) which when set causes your setters to queue the willChange, and when unset fires off any queued willChange's you've got the semantics I think you are after. –  CRD Aug 8 '12 at 8:58

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