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In the concurrency library GHC.Conc there is a function called numCapabilities. Its type is numCapabilities :: Int and it actually returns some number you passed by the command line flag (e.g. 5 if the options are +RTS -N 5).

However, getArgs (type: IO [String]) does essentially the same (it returns the unparsed non-runtime arguments) but isn't a pure function.

If the only excuse is that numCapabilities is often needed in pure code, in what way aren't other command line options not needed in pure code?

Am I something missing or is either numCapabilities a design flaw or am I allowed to write the following monster?

myGetArgs = unsafePerformIO getArgs
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5  
I'm now wondering the opposite: Since the value of getArgs never changes during the run of your program, I'm not exactly sure why it needs to/should be in IO. –  sepp2k Aug 7 '12 at 17:31
4  
As mentioned in one of the answers, it depends on how one defines a pure expression. I'd define an expression to be pure iff it doesn't depend on anything but the expression itself. By this definition numCapabilities isn't pure, so having a type of Int should be considered as a design flaw. You may be interested in Conal Elliott's blog post Notions of purity in Haskell. –  Petr Pudlák Aug 7 '12 at 18:05
    
numCapabilities need not return the value given to -N - it just calls getNumCapabilities, so returns however many capabilities there are at the time. I think of this as a bug, really, but it's hard to say what guarantees you can rely on in the GHC modules. –  Ben Millwood Aug 18 '12 at 21:56
    
(Notice that Control.Concurrent exports getNumCapabilities but not numCapabilities. If you stick to the "standard" interface, you don't see the impurity.) –  Ben Millwood Aug 18 '12 at 21:57
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4 Answers 4

up vote 21 down vote accepted

I've seen very varying views on what to do in situations like this. Some think that values that might vary between compiles should not be pure, and some think that as long as a value doesn't change during your program's local run-time (i.e. after some "configuration" has been "set up" in main), it should be pure.

The base package seems to have settled on a middle-ground. numCapabilities will not (as far as I know) change during run-time, but getArgs might.

This is because there is a withArgs function that changes the args you get via getArgs. So, that answers that.

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What about setNumCapabilities? –  Ptharien's Flame Aug 7 '12 at 18:03
9  
numCapabilities returns the parameter to -N#, while getNumCapabilities returns how many capabilities there actually are. setNumCapabilities changes the actual number, which is retrieved by getNumCapabilities. Both of the get* and set* functions are in the IO monad. –  dflemstr Aug 7 '12 at 18:05
    
Which leads to the question why there are both numCapabilities and getNumCapabilities and not both args and getArgs –  helami Aug 7 '12 at 18:06
12  
Because setNumCapabilities was added after numCapabilities, and numCapabilities is deprecated (as in, the library author says that you should use the get* function in the documentation for numCapabilities). –  dflemstr Aug 7 '12 at 18:08
2  
It's a deprecated value. It definitely used to return the parameter passed to -N# before, since it was impossible to change that number (because there was no setNumCapabilities). After the new functions were introduced, numCapabilities was deprecated, and is only kept for compatibility, so it does still behave consistently for programs that are not aware of set*. You should not use it for new programs; in other words, a program containing both numCapabilities and setNumCapabilities is semantically incorrect. –  dflemstr Apr 7 '13 at 7:47
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Oh dear. If you look at the definition of numCapabilities, you can see it is just:

numCapabilities :: Int
numCapabilities = unsafePerformIO $ getNumCapabilities

and the following ghci sessions illustrate the problem:

[ben@euler ~]$ ghci
GHCi, version 7.4.2: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/  :? for help
Loading [...]
ghci> :m +GHC.Conc
ghci> numCapabilities
1
ghci> setNumCapabilities 2
ghci> numCapabilities
1
ghci> :q
Leaving GHCi.

[ben@euler ~]$ ghci
GHCi, version 7.4.2: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/  :? for help
Loading [...]
ghci> :m +GHC.Conc
ghci> setNumCapabilities 2
ghci> numCapabilities
2

This is definitely bad - the value of numCapabilities depends on when it is evaluated with respect to any setNumCapabilities calls that may exist in your program. Note that in the first session, numCapabilities remained consistent, since the IO is only executed the first time it is evaluated. However, in the presence of inlining (the name isn't marked NOINLINE or anything) even that may not be true - you could in principle get two different values from two occurrences of numCapabilities (although in practice I haven't been able to make this happen).

So the answer is that numCapabilities isn't a pure function, but is erroneously marked as such by the notorious back door of unsafePerformIO.

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I'd say it's a mistake, but it depends on what one thinks purity is. See the post Notions of purity in Haskell and its discussion. Simply put, the post's argument is that types have meaning, and there is not room in the meaning of Int for something like numCapabilities, which is execution-context-dependent.

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numCapabilities gives the initial value of getNumCapabilities, wether or not the RTS -N flag argument is present, so the type should be the same.

Have you tried it with a higher number than your computer max. simultaneous threads ?

$ ghci +RTS -N99
GHCi, version 7.4.2: http://www.haskell.org/ghc/  :? for help
Prelude> :m +GHC.Conc
Prelude GHC.Conc> numCapabilities
99
Prelude GHC.Conc> getNumCapabilities
99   !!!
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