Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have an ARM based embedded system. I just bring up the kernel (2.6.34). Below are some command outputs. I am not able to account for whole of RAM (128 M).

Kernel seems to be using 128 MB - 124368 kB = 6704 kB.

Cache = 1672 kB
Slab = 3000 kB

But MemFree is only 100812 kB. How do I account for rest of the memory (around 18.5 MB)?

Also what does Committed_AS value of 1512 kB indicate?

# cat /proc/meminfo
MemTotal:         124368 kB
MemFree:          100812 kB
Buffers:               0 kB
Cached:             1672 kB
SwapCached:            0 kB
Active:             1692 kB
Inactive:            284 kB
Active(anon):        304 kB
Inactive(anon):        0 kB
Active(file):       1388 kB
Inactive(file):      284 kB
Unevictable:           0 kB
Mlocked:               0 kB
SwapTotal:             0 kB
SwapFree:              0 kB
Dirty:                 4 kB
Writeback:             0 kB
AnonPages:           328 kB
Mapped:              856 kB
Shmem:                 0 kB
Slab:               3000 kB
SReclaimable:       1116 kB
SUnreclaim:         1884 kB
KernelStack:         248 kB
PageTables:           48 kB
NFS_Unstable:          0 kB
Bounce:                0 kB
WritebackTmp:          0 kB
CommitLimit:       62184 kB
Committed_AS:       1512 kB
VmallocTotal:     876544 kB
VmallocUsed:        1848 kB
VmallocChunk:     873908 kB



# free
             total         used         free       shared      buffers
Mem:        124368        23584       100784            0            0
-/+ buffers:              23584       100784
Swap:            0            0            0



# lsmod
Module                  Size  Used by    Not tainted



# ps
  PID USER       VSZ STAT COMMAND
    1 0         1556 S    init
    2 0            0 SW   [kthreadd]
    3 0            0 SW   [ksoftirqd/0]
    4 0            0 SW   [watchdog/0]
    5 0            0 SW   [events/0]
    6 0            0 SW   [khelper]
   10 0            0 SW   [async/mgr]
  200 0            0 SW   [sync_supers]
  202 0            0 SW   [bdi-default]
  203 0            0 SW   [kblockd/0]
  209 0            0 SW   [ata/0]
  210 0            0 SW   [ata_aux]
  211 0            0 SW   [pxa2xx-spi.2]
  218 0            0 SW   [khubd]
  221 0            0 SW   [kseriod]
  234 0            0 SW   [kmmcd]
  253 0            0 SW   [rpciod/0]
  261 0            0 SW   [khungtaskd]
  262 0            0 SW   [kswapd0]
  264 0            0 SW   [aio/0]
  265 0            0 SW   [nfsiod]
  267 0            0 SW   [crypto/0]
  414 0            0 SW   [mtdblockd]
  457 0            0 SW   [ubi_bgt0d]
  537 0            0 SW   [usbhid_resumer]
  563 0            0 SW   [ubifs_bgt0_0]
  581 0         1556 S    telnetd -l /bin/sh
  586 0         1948 S <  udevd -d
 2956 0         1560 S    -/bin/sh
 3986 0            0 SW   [flush-ubifs_0_0]
 3990 0         4216 R    ps
share|improve this question
    
MemFree is going to show you what memory is not currently being used. All of your disk reads will get cached and that cache will be subtracted from MemFree; even though it could still be used if needed for something more important than read caching. Also /proc/iomem should tell you what memory addresses are mapped where if you believe you are missing memory- you can use that to find what addresses are being used for RAM. HTH –  tMC Aug 7 '12 at 19:23
    
Thanks for your reply. I already considered cache of 1672 kB. /proc/iomem is only indicating kernel text (5011 kB) and kernel data (394 kB) regions that fall in system RAM range. Other ranges are outside system RAM range. –  numis Aug 8 '12 at 3:50

1 Answer 1

(this was to long for a comment)

Committed_AS: An estimate of how much RAM you would need to make a
              99.99% guarantee that there never is OOM (out of memory)
              for this workload. Normally the kernel will overcommit
              memory. That means, say you do a 1GB malloc, nothing
              happens, really. Only when you start USING that malloc
              memory you will get real memory on demand, and just as
              much as you use. So you sort of take a mortgage and hope
              the bank doesn't go bust. Other cases might include when
              you mmap a file that's shared only when you write to it
              and you get a private copy of that data. While it normally
              is shared between processes. The Committed_AS is a
              guesstimate of how much RAM/swap you would need
              worst-case.

http://lwn.net/Articles/28345/

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.