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I am writing a function for a program that asks the user to input a "student id number" and stores it in the array. Before storing the function has to check if we don't already have that number in the array because the student numbers must be unique. It also includes a pointer to an int that represents how many student numbers have been stored so far. I have written some code but it is not working :( would anyone please shed some light? This is my code:

void update_student_id(int a[], int*pnum)
{
        int temp,h;
        for (h=0;h<=*pnum;h++){
                printf(">>>Student ID:");
                scanf("%d",&temp);
                        if (temp==a[h]){
                                printf("ERROR:%d has already been used!\n",temp);
                                h=*pnum+1;
                        }
                        else
                            h=*pnum+1;
            }
        a[*pnum]=temp;
        *pnum++;

Ok, new version with 2 for loops, improving but not working yet :(

void update_student_id(int a[], int*pnum)
{
    int temp,h,i;
    for (h=0;h<=*pnum;h++){
            printf(">>>Student ID:");
            scanf("%d",&temp);

            for(i=0;i<=*pnum;i++)
                    if (temp==a[i]){
                            printf("ERROR:%d has already been used!\n",temp);
                            i=*pnum+1;
                    }
                    else    i++;
            }
        a[*pnum]=temp;
        (*pnum)++;
}

Problem solved with Dennis' help, final code:

void update_student_id(int a[], int*pnum)
{
    int temp,h,i,canary;
    for (h = 0; h <= *pnum; h++) {
            printf(">>>Student ID:");
            scanf("%d", &temp);

    canary = 0;
    for (i = 0; i < *pnum; i++) {
            if (temp == a[i]) {
            printf("ERROR:%d has already been used!\n",temp);
            canary = 1;
            break;
            }
    }
    if (canary == 0) {
            a[*pnum] = temp;
            (*pnum)++;
            break;
        }
}

return;}
share|improve this question
    
done, thank you :) –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 17:49
    
*pnum++; does not do what you think it does -- you want (*pnum)++;. –  pmg Aug 7 '12 at 17:50
    
@pmg thank you, I fixed that. Now I still think it is not checking the whole array once I have entered a few elements :( –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 17:56
    
Hmm what exactly is i here? The way you are checking the array also seems a little off. Think about where you iterate to do the check? Should you be re-reading input in each iteration of the check or once you have iterated completely? –  another.anon.coward Aug 7 '12 at 17:59
    
Basically you have to have an outer loop for inputting numbers; and you have to have an inner loop to compare the last entered number to all the numbers already in the array. There may be ways to do it more efficiently, but I think this way is good enough for now. –  pmg Aug 7 '12 at 18:12
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closed as not a real question by the Tin Man, Sergey K., Stecya, kapa, ronalchn Sep 27 '12 at 10:46

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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

So, the main thing I see is that after you scan the number, you're not actually checking to see if the number is already in the array; you're only checking to see if it's at a particular index.

Being more specific, you need more than that if statement inside your for loop; perhaps another loop that looks through the indices used up so far.

EDIT: The biggest problem is that in the else clause, don't increment i. Second, you need some canary variable to let you know if you've made that call to printf.

For example, here's my idea for those loops:

for (h = 0; h < *pum; h++) {
    printf(">>>Student ID:");
    scanf("%d", &temp);

    canary = 0; // assuming you initialize this at beginning of function
    for (i = 0; i < *pnum; i++) {
        if (temp == a[i]) {
            printf("ERROR:%d has already been used!\n",temp);
            canary = 1;
            break;
        }
        // DON'T INCREMENT i, LOOP IS ALREADY DOING IT
    }

    // if canary is still 0, we know we haven't called that printf
    // and can add in the element. Only then do we increment the count.
    if (canary == 0) {
        a[*pnum] = temp;
        (*pnum)++;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
So I re wrote it like this: –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 19:02
    
{ int temp,h,i; for (h=0;h<=*pnum;h++){ printf(">>>Student ID:"); scanf("%d",&temp); for(i=0;i<=*pnum;i++) if (temp==a[i]){ printf("ERROR:%d has already been used!\n",temp); i=*pnum+1; } else i++; } a[*pnum]=temp; (*pnum)++; } –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 19:02
    
Thank you so much Dennis, I took your advice. –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 20:23
    
now once I run the program, when I enter the first ID number it asks me for the id number again, I enter the same number it gives the error message and proceeds to the next function :( –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 20:24
    
What did you want your program to do when it finds a repeat? (Also note that my code isn't 100% correct; the idea was to show how to use a canary value) –  Dennis Meng Aug 7 '12 at 20:26
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If - if - you can maintain your IDs in sorted order then there are a number of big optimisations you can get. This would almost certainly involve moving away from a simple array as the container. Something like a heap would be a good fit. If you want to keep using an array and don't mind insertions being O(n) then you can maintain sort order and get existence checking with a binary search. The standard library bsearch() function unfortunately doesn't tell you where you should insert an element if a match is not find. Writing your own binary search is a surprisingly hard thing to get right, but if you do it's nice reusable code. What you want is a function that returns true or false if the element exists and either a pointer to the matching element or the immediately lower value if it doesn't exist (or the array pointer itself if no elements are smaller.) Then in the case of no match being found, you would shuffle all larger elements up one place and insert the new element.

Since this is a homework problem I guess you're limited to C, but a C++ STL set<int> reduces the work you would have to do to a few lines.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks David :) –  PhillToronto Aug 7 '12 at 21:01
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