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SELECT table1.waypoint,table1.latitude,
       table1.longitude,table1.airway
FROM 
  airways table1
JOIN 
   (SELECT * FROM airways
    WHERE waypoint='KORED') AS table2
  ON table1.airway = table2.airway 
WHERE table1.sequence=table2.sequence+1 
   OR table1.sequence=table2.sequence-1

Hello,

I'm trying to optimize the above query. The query time is pretty high at the moment (around 0.9s). I'm only using one table (~100k entries), JOINING it with itself. The IN syntax doesn't work in my Synology MYSQL 5.1. (Somehow makes it crash using SELECT s1 FROM t1 WHERE s1 IN (SELECT s1 FROM t2); The query time is around 0.2s without using the WHERE part of it. I've Indexed the table on sequence and waypoint.

Thank you!

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1  
Can you show the query execution plan by putting EXPLAIN in front of that query and running it and posting the output here? –  drew010 Aug 7 '12 at 17:54
    
It's the math that you are doing, as soon as you are saying X = Y+1 you basically kill any indexing as it has to do math on every row. I would suggest adding a couple fields to the table, call them sequence_increment, sequence_decrement, or something like that and store those values, index on those columns and you should see a large improvement. –  invertedSpear Aug 7 '12 at 18:38
    
In phpMyadmin the query shows (using EXPLAIN). 1 PRIMARY <derived2> ALL NULL NULL NULL NULL 4 1 PRIMARY table1 ALL sequence NULL NULL NULL 87850 Range checked for each record (index map: 0x4) 2 DERIVED airways ref waypoint waypoint 18 3 Using where. I'm going to try the "adding field" option. But it would be easier if there were a SQL solution for that problem. –  user1582655 Aug 7 '12 at 20:39
    
What indexes do you have on the airways table? it doesn't look like you have one on the field airway which might make a large difference –  invertedSpear Aug 7 '12 at 21:23
    
You're my hero, that did it, down to 0.0087s. Thank you very much! –  user1582655 Aug 7 '12 at 21:28

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Not sure if this will help as much as my suggestion of actually adding these fields to the table itself and indexing on them, but you might try just moving the math out of the where and into the select:

SELECT table1.waypoint,table1.latitude,
       table1.longitude,table1.airway
FROM 
  airways table1
JOIN 
   (SELECT *,sequence + 1 as sequence_inc, sequence - 1 as sequence_dec FROM airways
    WHERE waypoint='KORED') AS table2
  ON table1.airway = table2.airway 
WHERE table1.sequence=table2.sequence_inc
   OR table1.sequence=table2.sequence_dec

EDIT Ok, so that doesn't help, but based on your explain I think the real problem is a lack of index on the airway field of the airways table that you are using to join. Add that index and see if that improves your performance.

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I tried that one, it also takes around 0.9s. Any other ideas how to improve that query? Do you maybe know why the "IN" statement stalls the database? Is splitting up the queries a reasonable option? –  user1582655 Aug 7 '12 at 20:30
    
If you do an IN (select ...) mySQL will run that subquery for every row in your outer table. I'm not sure what you mean by splitting the queries up. –  invertedSpear Aug 7 '12 at 21:13
    
OK so "IN" is not an option. By splitting it up I think about using only parts of the query and storing the values inside the script and use the data received in the other queries. –  user1582655 Aug 7 '12 at 21:18
    
I see, calling multiple queries is an option, but I think you want to limit round trips to the DB if possible. –  invertedSpear Aug 7 '12 at 21:26

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