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I'm trying to setup a system where I can add python scripts to a directory, and the next time I load gdb they will be accessible (the point being to place this in version control and allow other engineers simple access to my helper scripts). For starters I've written a hello.py file, and when I type source /path/to/hello.py in gdb, and then type hello it works as expected.

How do I make GDB do this automatically? The documentation suggests using the data-directory, and placing scripts in data-directory/python/gdb/command. Placing my hello.py file in this directory does nothing though (however it does end up creating a hello.pyc file).

I've additionally tried adding this directory to my directory listing with dir /path/to/hello/ and then hoping to be able to type source hello.py but this also fails.

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4 Answers 4

You'll need to set auto-load on using the following command:

set auto-load python-scripts on

Reference: http://sourceware.org/gdb/current/onlinedocs/gdb/Python-Auto_002dloading.html#Python-Auto_002dloading

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I saw that, but whenever I try typing that (either in gdb, or putting it in my .gdbinit) it gives me the error: "on" or "off" expected. I think it is just calling whatever it does for "auto-load" and passing that "python-scripts". –  Dave Aug 7 '12 at 19:34

Make a .gdbinit file, and put all your source commands in there in the same directory where you'll be starting gdb from. I believe the file will look something like this:

.gdbinit

source /path/to/hello.py
source /path/to/foobar.py
etc, etc

reference

EDIT: Including the .gdbinit file in your version control will make sure that the files are included, independent of the global gdb settings.

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Thanks. That does work, but I was hoping there was something that could do this in a more automated fashion. This requires manually adding each script to the .gdbinit, plus including a full path (my attempts to source a python file without the full path result in bizarre errors). I suppose I could have a bash script that automatically generates a .gdbinit file and passes all the paths based on where the user has setup their version control, but I was hopeful the GDB designers put hooks in for something like this. –  Dave Aug 7 '12 at 19:37
    
Maybe you could add the generation of .gdbinit to your Makefile? I agree, it's too bad there's not a clean way of doing it (that I know of). –  Gordon Bailey Aug 7 '12 at 19:47
    
I feel like I must be missing something simple. In particular the last line about the data-directory here. But having a second person unclear helped me make up a hackish solution. Thanks! –  Dave Aug 7 '12 at 20:37

It seems there must be a better way, but for now I did the following. To .gdbinit I added:source /path/to/setup_python.py

Then I wrote the file setup_python.py as:

#!/usr/bin/python
import glob
import os

# Search the python dir for all .py files, and source each
setup_dir = os.path.dirname(__file__)
python_dir = os.path.join(setup_dir, "python")
py_files = glob.glob("%s/*.py" % python_dir)

for py_file in py_files:
    gdb.execute('source %s' % py_file)

This will source all files in the python sub-directory, and both setup_python.py and those files can be checked into source control.

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I was looking for an answer to the same question today. Eventually I came up with the following:

.gdbinit

python
import glob

python_dir = "/path/to/python"

# Search the python dir for all .py files, and source each
py_files = glob.glob("%s/*.py" % python_dir)
for py_file in py_files:
    gdb.execute('source %s' % py_file)
end
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