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I'm currently developing an RPG game using C++ and SFML on Windows. Currently it is working well but when I was checking over everything I realized that since all data such as items, inventory, creatures, battles, NPCs, shops, etc. is stored in text files that they would be very simple to manipulate with any text editor.

I want to prevent this data from being manipulated easily at the very least. Obviously whenever data is stored with the release someone will get through and be able to edit it.

I was wondering what the best route to go about protecting this data would be while still maintaining the ability to edit it with tools that will be built in the future such as map editors, item editors, NPC editors, etc. as well as the engine itself.

I would highly prefer writing my own and to just get some ideas on how this would be best to accomplish it because I am mainly using this to learn the languages better. If anyone truly believes that this is foolish please let me know so I may consider optional libraries to use.

If you do the later I would appreciate anyone that could recommend a good one for me to use.

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First of all, gamedev.stackexchange.com would probably be better qualified to help you. Second of all, as you said yourself, regardless of how you store files, a user will eventually be able to modify them. Therefore, as long as your game is single player (if it's not, you have a server to enforce such things anyway), I wouldn't worry. Store the files in a subfolder of your game's install and let people who don't want to play the actual game modify them as they please. It doesn't hurt anyone in any way :) –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Aug 7 '12 at 18:03
    
Good point but as I said this is mainly for practice and probably wont be distributed to anyone besides friends. I'm trying to practice as many areas as possible and put them all together. –  Kethaias Aug 7 '12 at 18:07
    
That makes a huge difference :) In that case, Heisenbug probably nailed it in his answer! –  Anthony Vallée-Dubois Aug 7 '12 at 18:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I was wondering what the best route to go about protecting this data would be while still maintaining the ability to edit it with tools that will be built in the future such as map editors, item editors, NPC editors, etc. as well as the engine itself.

I don't think there is a best solution. The simplest one could be encrypt the files, hardcoding the key to decrypt them inside your game. This won't prevent a reverse engineering of your binaries to recover the key though.

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+1, this is a good starting point. Its weakness (reverse engineering) can be avoided if you use an asymmetric cryptographic algorithm (i.e. a public key and private key pair). There are lots of free implementations available. –  dario_ramos Aug 7 '12 at 18:06
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I don't think that asymmetric cryptography could solve this problem. In fact an hardcoded private key in the binaries, would still be found. –  Heisenbug Aug 7 '12 at 18:07
    
Thanks for the recommendation. I was considering something such as this but I was thinking there might be some sort of file you could store it in. A dream, I know. XD –  Kethaias Aug 7 '12 at 18:09
    
I thought about distributing the private key in another way (not hardcoding), for example using a private key server, making them part of the license key, or a usb token. That might make deployment more complex; it depends on the app. Anyway, knowing the key is not enough. You also need to know the encryption algorithm used, so it's not that weak. –  dario_ramos Aug 7 '12 at 18:09
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You can make a crytographically secure format for editing the files because you don't have to distribute the private key if all the client needs to do is read the data files. It doesn't stop a determined hacker from finding the stored public key and reading the file. But you can control who can edit the file. –  Rafael Baptista Aug 7 '12 at 18:11

Have your game engine read the files both as text and in a binary format. The binary format could be as simple as just using zip compression on the file directory. Then you could implement a checksum on the binary files.

For development you would use the text versions, but in the live game you allow only reading of the binary format, and you reject files that fail the checksum.

This isn't super secure as someone would reverse engineer the checksum. But it will prevent the casual user from editing your game data. You could make this more secure by having the game client validate the game data checksums against known good checksums on the server.

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