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I am newbie to MVC3 and I wonder if this is even possible and good practice?

I have a model + view + controller which works fine. This view shows a list of people - I want to be able to click on a person's name and be redirected to a new view that will show that persons details. This new view only has a ViewModel, but no controller because I plan to pass in the object in the action.

The Person object contains all the properties my view needs to show: @Html.ActionLink(item.Person.FirstName, "PersonDetails", item.Person)

Is this possible/good practice??

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When you click on that Person Detail link, you have to understand that this will create a GET request to a web service. That web service which will evaluate the route you are requesting and match it with a Area?, Controller and Action along with binding the request parameters (GET or POST). In the end, what you really ask for is an answer from a controller, not a View. The CONTROLLER will ask for a view so he can render a cute page to send to you, but it is still the CONTROLLER that sends it. –  Pluc Aug 7 '12 at 20:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I believe you have an misunderstanding of how MVC works. Your ActionLink will ALWAYS redirect to a corresponding ActionMethod of a Controller. What you'll want to do is create an action method in your controller that accepts the necessary parameters and then returns to the View your ViewModel.

Here is a very quick example to get you started:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    public ActionResult List()
    {
        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult DetailById(int i)
    {
        // load person from data source by id = i

        // build PersonDetailViewModel from data returned 

        return View("PersonDetails", PersonDetailViewModel);
    }

    public ActionResult DetailByVals(string FirstName, Person person)
    {
        // build PersonDetailViewModel manually from data passed in
        // you may have to work through some binding issues here with Person
        return View("PersonDetails", PersonDetailViewModel);
    }
}
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Thank you for your help. I ended up having to create an Action method in the controller of the view where I want to click on a person's name. Then in that method, I redirect the action with the object to the action method in the controller of the view where I want to show the person's details. It works, but is this the best way to do it? –  Reda Aug 7 '12 at 22:33
    
It may work, but understand Actions,Views,ViewModels. Actions are simply "actions my application performs". In your case 1)list 2)details. Those 2 actions map to unique action methods in the controller each having their own view. 1 view for the list and another for details. The list View displays the grid and somewhere in the grid you have a hyperlink to Action2 to display details. I would pass the id of the Person and use that id to pull info from data source instead of passing all the data in the query string. To each view, you pass a viewmodel that contains the req'd data for the view. –  Shawn Aug 8 '12 at 17:38

Not a good way to do it like you want to (in your original post). A view should always have a view model. A view model represents only the data that you want to have on the view, nothing more and nothing less. Do not pass your domail model to the view, but rather use a view model. This view model might contain just a portain of the properties of your domain model.

In your list view you probably have a grid, and next to each row you probably have a details link, or a link on the name (as you have it). When either of these links are clicked then you are directed to a details view. This details view will have its own view model with only the properties that you need to display on the details view.

A domail model might look something like:

public class Person
{
     public int Id { get; set; }

     public string FirstName { get; set; }

     public string LastName { get; set; }

     public int Age { get; set; }

     public string ExampleProperty1 { get; set; }

     public string ExampleProperty2 { get; set; }

     public string ExampleProperty3 { get; set; }
}

Let say you only want to display the person's id, first name, last name and age then your view model will look like this:

public class PersonDetailsViewModel
{
     public int Id { get; set; }

     public string FirstName { get; set; }

     public string LastName { get; set; }

     public int Age { get; set; }
}

You don't need ExampleProperty1, ExampleProperty2 and ExampleProperty3 because they are not required.

Your person controller might look like this:

public class PersonController : Controller
{
     private readonly IPersonRepository personRepository;

     public PersonController(IPersonRepository personRepository)
     {
          // Check that personRepository is not null

          this.personRepository = personRepository;
     }

     public ActionResult Details(int id)
     {
          // Check that id is not 0 or less than 0

          Person person = personRepository.GetById(id);

          // Now that you have your person, do a mapping from domain model to view model
          // I use AutoMapper for all my mappings

          PersonDetailsViewModel viewModel = Mapper.Map<PersonDetailsViewModel>(person);

          return View(viewModel);
     }
}

I hope this clears things up a little more.

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