Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a set of elements like this:

<ol id="selectable">
    <li class="ui-state-default">A</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">B</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">C</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">D</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">E</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">F</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">G</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">H</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">I</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">J</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">K</li>
    <li class="ui-state-default">L</li>
</ol>

This is my jquery code:

$(function() {
        $( "#selectable" ).click(function(){
            $(this).switchClass( "ui-state-highlight", 1000 );
            return false;   
        });
    });

For some reason I am having trouble understanding what I am doing wrong. I think I may be misunderstanding the meaning of 'this'. I want the switchClass only to switch the class of whichever element I clicked on.

share|improve this question
    
what is it exactly that you're trying to do? Are you trying to transition between classes on the <ul> or the <li> elements? In either case, .switchClass requires a class name to transition TO; you're only providing the class name to transition FROM. –  jackwanders Aug 7 '12 at 19:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you want is this

$(function() {
    // Use $( "#selectable > li" ) if you want to limit to direct children
    $( "#selectable li" ).click(function(){  //  binds the click event all li descendants of selectable
        $(this).switchClass("ui-state-default", "ui-state-highlight", 1000);  // this is now the li that was clicked
        return false;   
    });
});

better way would be to delegate as it's more efficient by not binding an event handler to each li but having a parent element listen for the event as it bubbles up

$(function() {
    $( "#selectable" ).on('click','li'(function(){  
        $(this).switchClass("ui-state-default", "ui-state-highlight", 1000);  // this is now the li that was clicked
        return false;   
    });
});

unless you want to click each #selectable which wouldn't be valid since ID's need to be unique. You can change it to a class and use

$(function() {
    $( ".selectable" ).click(function(){  
        $(this).switchClass("ui-state-default", "ui-state-highlight", 1000);  
        return false;   
    });
});

You can use toggleClass like the following

$(function() {
    $("#selectable").on('click', 'li', function() {
        $(this).toggleClass("ui-state-default ui-state-highlight"); // this is now the li that was clicked
        return false;
    });
});​

http://jsfiddle.net/G33Mc/

share|improve this answer
1  
This is true, but it would be much more efficient to delegate the event handler to #selectable. –  James Allardice Aug 7 '12 at 19:44
    
yeah that's true –  ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ Aug 7 '12 at 19:45
    
This ignores the fact that the call to switchClass is flawed. –  jackwanders Aug 7 '12 at 19:48
    
It appears what I was looking for was the 'toggleClass' call. Thanks for the help guys –  Bryce64 Aug 7 '12 at 19:54
    
@Bryce64 NP. Glad to help –  ᾠῗᵲᄐᶌ Aug 7 '12 at 19:56

If you're looking to select the children, you could go about it using any of the following methods. :)

$(function() {
    // this will find all immediate children inside #selectable
    $('#selectable').children().click(function() {
        $(this).switchClass('ui-state-highlight', 1000); 
    });

    // this will find all immediate children that, are an li, inside #selectable
    $('#selectable > li').click(function() {
        $(this).switchClass('ui-state-highlight', 1000); 
    });

    // alternatively, we could look for all anchors inside the li items
    $('#selectable li a').click(function() {
        $(this).switchClass('ui-state-highlight', 1000); 
    });
});
share|improve this answer

It appears this is what you want, assuming you're trying to transition between the 'default' class and the 'highlight' class. This is a delegated event attached to the #selectable element which will fire whenever an li within it is clicked. this will refer to the li clicked.

$( "#selectable" ).on('click','li',function(e){
    e.preventDefault();
    $(this).switchClass("ui-state-default", "ui-state-highlight", 1000);
});
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.