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Project compiled against .NET Framework 3.5 allows C# 4.0 features

Recently ReSharper suggested in my Visual Studio 2010 solution that I could use optional parameter in one of my methods. I was supprised, as project was targeted to .NET 3.5 and as far as I know optional parameters were introduced with C# 4.0.

But I made a change and it compiled.

On the other hand I tried if covariance and contravariance work with .NET Framework 3.5 generic IEnumerable, and it didn't. Could you advise what piece of knowledge I'm missing?

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marked as duplicate by asawyer, casperOne Aug 9 '12 at 13:39

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Variance for generic interfaces and delegates was introduced in the .NET Framework 2.0, but only useable to developers until the C# 4.0 compiler was able to take advantage of that.

It wasn't until the .NET Framework 4 that the framework's library types were updated for this type of variance. .NET 3.5 generic variance works fine with the C# 4 compiler, but only with your own types. This compiles just fine on the .NET Framework 3.5 with the C# 4 compiler.

public interface IFoo<out T>
{
    T Bar();
}

public class Baz<T> : IFoo<T>
{
    public T Bar()
    {
        return default(T);
    }
}

public class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        IFoo<IConvertible> foo = new Baz<string>();
    }
}

Peter Richie left a comment that bears enough importance that it should be a part of the answer:

Variance has always in .NET, for example arrays of reference types have always been covariant. As well, method group variance has been around since .NET 2.0. What you're talking about is the added generic interface variance abilities added to C# 4--often referred to as "Covariance and Contravariance in Generics" in the documentation.

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Thanks! Actually, what is even more amazing that it compiled with C# 4 compiler and .NET Framework 2.0. –  dragonfly Aug 7 '12 at 21:10
2  
Variance has always in .NET, for example arrays of reference types have always been covariant. As well, method group variance has been around since .NET 2.0. What you're talking about is the added generic interface variance abilities added to C# 4--often referred to as "Covariance and Contravariance in Generics" in the documentation. –  Peter Ritchie Aug 7 '12 at 21:45
    
@PeterRitchie You are absolutely right, thank you for reminding me of that. I hope you don't mind me incorporating that comment into my answer for sake of correctness. –  vcsjones Aug 8 '12 at 0:20
    
@vcsjones no problem –  Peter Ritchie Aug 8 '12 at 2:49
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