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Given an array of integers...

var numbers = new int[] { 1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2,1,2,1 };

I need to determine a the maximum sequence of numbers that alternate up then down or down then up.

Not sure the best way to approach this, the process psuedo wise strikes me as simple but materializing code for it is evading me.

The key is the fact we are looking for max sequence, so while the above numbers could be interpreted in many ways, like a sequence of seven up-down-up and seven down-up-down the important fact is starting with the first number there is a down-up-down sequence that is 14 long.

Also I should not that we count the first item, 121 is a sequence of length 3, one could argue the sequence doesn't begin until the second digit but lets not split hairs.

share|improve this question
6  
Your Question is too vague. Show in more detail What you would like to do. – Dylan Aug 7 '12 at 21:47
1  
Sounds like max increasing sub-sequence, only check for alternate instead of increasing. – NominSim Aug 7 '12 at 21:48
    
Is it always 1s and 2s? Do you need to know the start position of the streak, or just the max size? – James Aug 7 '12 at 21:50
    
and do they always differ by 1? – Tony Hopkinson Aug 7 '12 at 21:51
    
No, it can be vastly different than 1 and 2, I just wanted a simple example to avoid noise. – keithwarren7 Aug 7 '12 at 21:52

This seems to work, it assumes that the length of numbers is greater than 4 (that case should be trivial anyways):

var numbers = new int[] { 1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2,1,2,1 };
int count = 2, max = 0;
for (int i = 1; i < numbers.Length - 1; i++)
{

    if ((numbers[i - 1] < numbers[i] && numbers[i + 1] < numbers[i]) ||
                    (numbers[i - 1] > numbers[i] && numbers[i + 1] > numbers[i]))
    {
        count++;
        max = Math.Max(count, max);
    }
    else if ((numbers[i - 1] < numbers[i]) || (numbers[i - 1] > numbers[i])
                || ((numbers[i] < numbers[i + 1]) || (numbers[i] > numbers[i + 1])))
    {
        max = Math.Max(max, 2);
        count = 2;
    }
}
Console.WriteLine(max); // 14
share|improve this answer
    
There are 14 items in the largest sequence. – Abe Miessler Aug 7 '12 at 22:16
    
@AbeMiessler Whoops, you're right: I forgot to count the last item, corrected now. – NominSim Aug 7 '12 at 22:20
    
Those "off by one"s will sneak up on you – Abe Miessler Aug 7 '12 at 22:24
    
{ 1, 2, 2, 2 } returns 0 – drch Aug 7 '12 at 23:12
1  
@drch Maybe it works now for every case, in any case, the right answer to a question on SO is not always providing a fully debugged, working solution. Especially when the OP asks for an approach and not the result, it is good to give them a means to solve their issue on their own. – NominSim Aug 8 '12 at 2:04

Here's how I thought of it

  • First, you need to know whether you're starting high or starting low. eg: 1-2-1 or 2-1-2. You might not even have an alternating pair.
  • Then, you consider each number afterwards to see if it belongs in the sequence, taking into consideration the current direction.
  • Everytime the sequence breaks, you need to start again by checking the direction.

I am not sure if it is possible that out of the numbers you have already seen, picking a different starting number can POSSIBLY generate a longer sequence. Maybe there is a theorem that shows it is not possible; maybe it is obvious and I am over-thinking. But I don't think it is possible since the reason why a sequence is broken is because you have two high's or two low's and there is no way around this.

I assumed the following cases

  • {} - no elements, returns 0
  • {1} - single element, returns 0
  • {1, 1, 1} - no alternating sequence, returns 0

No restriction on the input beyond what C# expects. It could probably be condensed. Not sure if there is a way to capture the direction-change logic without explicitly keeping track of the direction.

static int max_alternate(int[] numbers)
{
  int maxCount = 0;
  int count = 0;
  int dir = 0; // whether we're going up or down

  for (int j = 1; j < numbers.Length; j++)
  {
      // don't know direction yet
      if (dir == 0)
      {
          if (numbers[j] > numbers[j-1])
          {
              count += 2; // include first number
              dir = 1; // start low, up to high
          }
          else if (numbers[j] < numbers[j-1])
          {
              count += 2;
              dir = -1; // start high, down to low
          }
      }
      else
      {
          if (dir == -1 && numbers[j] > numbers[j-1])
          {
              count += 1;
              dir = 1; // up to high
          }
          else if (dir == 1 && numbers[j] < numbers[j-1])
          {
              count += 1;
              dir = -1; // down to low
          }
          else 
          {
              // sequence broken
              if (count > maxCount)
              {
                  maxCount = count;
              }
              count = 0;
              dir = 0;
          }
      }
  }
  // final check after loop is done
  if (count > maxCount)
  {
      maxCount = count;
  }
  return maxCount;
}

And some test cases with results based on my understanding of the question and some assumptions.

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    int[] nums = { 1};            // base case == 0
    int[] nums2 = { 2, 1 };       // even case == 2
    int[] nums3 = { 1, 2, 1 };    // odd case == 3
    int[] nums4 = { 2, 1, 2 };    // flipped starting == 3
    int[] nums5 = { 2, 1, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1 }; // broken seqeuence == 4
    int[] nums6 = { 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1 }; // long sequence == 14
    Console.WriteLine(max_alternate(nums));
    Console.WriteLine(max_alternate(nums2));
    Console.WriteLine(max_alternate(nums3));
    Console.WriteLine(max_alternate(nums4));
    Console.WriteLine(max_alternate(nums5));
    Console.WriteLine(max_alternate(nums6));
    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for thorough test cases =] – drch Aug 8 '12 at 1:15

I'm not from a pc with a compiler right now, so I just give a try:

int max = 0;
int aux =0;
for(int i = 2 ; i < length; ++i)
{
    if (!((numbers[i - 2] > numbers[i - 1] && numbers[i - 1] < numbers[i]) ||
           numbers[i - 2] < numbers[i - 1] && numbers[i - 1] > numbers[i]))
    {
        aux = i - 2;
    }
    max = Math.Max(i - aux,max);
}
if (max > 0 && aux >0)
    ++max;

Note: should works for sequence of at least 3 elements.

share|improve this answer
    
@NominSim: could you clarify your objection? I mean, I'm not checking for 1 or 2 explicitly..what am I missing? Sorry but I can't test it right now..maybe better if I remove the answer but the question was nice :) – Heisenbug Aug 7 '12 at 22:15
    
@NominSim: oh thanks.. now I understand.. I'll fix the condition then. – Heisenbug Aug 7 '12 at 22:39
1  
@NominSim: fixed. Now should works. – Heisenbug Aug 7 '12 at 22:50
1  
Yessir, +1..... – NominSim Aug 7 '12 at 22:53
    
{ 2, 2, 1, 2, 1 } this returned 3, though the largest sequence is 2, 1, 2, 1. I'm still trying to understand the logic though since it's a nice compact solution rather than checking a dozen cases. – MxyL Aug 8 '12 at 0:25

There are probably a lot of ways to approach this, but here is one option:

var numbers = new int[] { 7,1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 1, 2, 2, 2, 1, 2, 1 };
int maxCount = 0;
for (int j = 0; j+1 < numbers.Length; j++)
{
    int count = 0;
    if (numbers[j] < numbers[j+1])
    {
        count += 2;
        for (int i = j+2; i+1 < numbers.Length; i += 2)
        {
            if (numbers[i] < numbers[i + 1] )
            {
                count += 2;
            }
            else
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
    if (maxCount < count)
    {
        maxCount = count;
    }
}
Console.WriteLine(maxCount);
Console.ReadLine();

This solution assumes that you want a sequence of the same two alternating numbers. If that's not a requirement you could alter the second if.

Now that it's written out, it looks more complex than I had imagined in my head... Maybe someone else can come up with a better solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Good point, this just counts the length of the sequence from the beginning. I'll update the answer to address that. – Abe Miessler Aug 7 '12 at 21:57
    
Looks good to me, +1. :) – NominSim Aug 7 '12 at 22:23
    
What if the input contained an odd number of values in a sequence? (note this is after the clarifications were made) – MxyL Aug 7 '12 at 23:05
    
It should still work. You should be able to copy and paste that code into a console app if you want to test with different sequences – Abe Miessler Aug 7 '12 at 23:07

Assumes at least 2 elements.

int max = 1;
bool expectGreaterThanNext = (numbers[0] > numbers[1]);
int count = 1;

for (var i = 0; i < numbers.Length - 1; i++)
{
    if (numbers[i] == numbers[i + 1] || expectGreaterThanNext && numbers[i] < numbers[i + 1])
    {
        count = 1;
        expectGreaterThanNext = (i != numbers.Length - 1) && !(numbers[i] > numbers[i+1]);
        continue;
    }
    count++;
    expectGreaterThanNext = !expectGreaterThanNext;

    max = Math.Max(count, max);
}
share|improve this answer
    
2, 2, 1, 2, 1 returns 2. I believe it should return 4. – MxyL Aug 8 '12 at 0:51
1  
@Keikoku fixed, – drch Aug 8 '12 at 1:05
    
The equality check would take care of having "no direction". That makes sense. – MxyL Aug 8 '12 at 1:57

This works for any integers, it tracks low-hi-low and hi-low-hi just like you asked.

int numbers[] = new int[] { 1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,1,2,2,2,1,2,1 };

   int count = 0;
   int updownup = 0;
   int downupdown = 0;
   for(int x = 0;x<=numbers.Length;x++)
   {
      if(x<numbers.Length - 2)
      {
         if(numbers[x]<numbers[x+1])
         {
          if(numbers[x+1]>numbers[x+2])
           {
           downupdown++; 
            }
         }

    }
}
count = 0;
for(x=0;x<=numbers.Length;x++)
{
  if(x<numbers.Length - 2)
  {
    if(numbers[x]>numbers[x+1]
    {
     if(numbers[x+1]<numbers[x+2])
     {
        updownup++;
        }
    }
    }

}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't C#, which isn't a big deal, but it doesn't produce the correct result either. – NominSim Aug 7 '12 at 22:13

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