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I'm in trouble trying to make this code to work. What I'm trying to do is to make my program to calculate some specific algorithm in parallel. Some times it works, some time is doesn't. This happens often when I run it with big numbers, but I can see in top (linux command) a lot of defunct processes and I think this happen because my forks are ending asyncronous and some childs are being left behind. But I thought in the beginning that my logic was at least making possible to finish all the calculations because I've set 2 control vars, flags and alldone, which are both shared memory space and are used to finish the while loop. I've been searching for some light and now I come here to ask for help since I can't find something that would help me. Can anyone help me with my logical problem in the following code in some way that my processes can be finished in the right sequence avoiding lefting defunct process behind? Thanks in advance!

    for(i=0;i<numforks*sizeof(int);i++)
        flags[i] = 0;

    *alldone = numforks;
    pid = fork();

    if(pid==0) {
        pid1 = fork();
        pid2 = fork();
        pid3 = fork();

        #ifdef DEBUG_F
            printf("worker process\n");
        #endif

        do {
            thisfork = thisfork -1;
            if( flags[thisfork] == 0){
                flags[thisfork] = 1;
                #ifdef DEBUG_THREADS
                    printf("flags[%d] was zero now is %d\n", thisfork, flags[thisfork]);
                #endif
                if(thisfork == 7) {
                    heme(0,riall,chunk_size,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 6) {
                    heme(chunk_size,riall,chunk_size*2,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 5) {
                    heme(chunk_size*2,riall,chunk_size*3,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 4) {
                    heme(chunk_size*3,riall,chunk_size*4,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 3) {
                    heme(chunk_size*4,riall,chunk_size*5,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 2) {
                    heme(chunk_size*5,riall,chunk_size*6,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 1) {
                    heme(chunk_size*6,riall,chunk_size*7,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
                if(thisfork == 0) {
                    heme(chunk_size*7,riall,chunk_size*8,r,pp,qq);
                    (*alldone)--;
                }
            }
        } while( thisfork > 0 && alldone > 0 );

        exit(0);

    } else {
        wait(&stat);
    }
share|improve this question
    
A defunct process is only occupying sufficient memory for its stats such as execution time. It also occupies a slot in the process table but unless you fork off a huge number, that doesn't cause any problems. –  Spaceghost Aug 7 '12 at 22:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If alldone is in shared memory, then you need to apply atomic decrement. Otherwise, your alldone counter can be left in an inconsistent state. If you are using GCC, you can use a builtin to do the decrement.

__sync_sub_and_fetch(alldone, 1);
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting, so I think this apply to flags manipulation too, right? –  Maginot Junior Aug 7 '12 at 22:31
    
@user1583145: If more than one process is manipulating the same flag, then you will need to use an atomic. See the gcc documentation on atomic builtins. –  jxh Aug 7 '12 at 22:35

You start multiple children in the code above, but you call wait() just once. You need to wait for all of the children to terminate, not just one of them.

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I know. I'm trying to achieve that, but still trying to make my logic to work... the first wait is for the master process that will continue the calculations after all the childs have finished calculating the chunk in the heme function. I thought that leaving defunct processes would not be the problem if the calculation were made correctly. I'm taking a look at the utilization of __sync_sub_and_fetch –  Maginot Junior Aug 7 '12 at 22:37

This is not related to your problem, but you should really change this:

if(thisfork == 7) {
    heme(0,riall,chunk_size,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 6) {
    heme(chunk_size,riall,chunk_size*2,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 5) {
    heme(chunk_size*2,riall,chunk_size*3,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 4) {
    heme(chunk_size*3,riall,chunk_size*4,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 3) {
    heme(chunk_size*4,riall,chunk_size*5,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 2) {
    heme(chunk_size*5,riall,chunk_size*6,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 1) {
    heme(chunk_size*6,riall,chunk_size*7,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
if(thisfork == 0) {
    heme(chunk_size*7,riall,chunk_size*8,r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}

to this:

if(thisfork >= 0 && thisfork <=7){
    heme((7 - thisfork),riall,chunk_size*(8 - thisfork),r,pp,qq);
    (*alldone)--;
}
share|improve this answer
    
thank you for the advice, I agree with what you said looks much better and compact, thank you again EDIT: heme(chunk_size*(7 - thisfork),riall,chunk_size*(8 - thisfork),r,pp,qq); –  Maginot Junior Aug 7 '12 at 22:38
    
No problem, glad to help –  Gordon Bailey Aug 7 '12 at 22:43

You can use wait() function which stops your parent process untill your child gets terminate or complete.

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