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I have a completely blank custom table (DatabaseLogFixLog) with only one field/column called "refRecId". I am joining it to SysDatabaseLog (log). The plan is to update SysDatabaseLog in batches, and as I update the SysDatabaseLog, I'll insert the recId of the row I updated. My SysDatabaseLog has 3.7 million records in it. I have tried both notexists join and outer join seen below. What's wrong with my code? Both just completely lock up my system, and the debugger will not get inside the loops.

Outer join:

updateCounter = 10;
while select forupdate log
    order by CreatedDateTime, RecId
    outer join databaseLogFixLog
    where databaseLogFixLog.RefRecId != log.RecId
{
    counter++;

    if (counter > updateCount)
        break;

    info(strfmt("%1", counter));
}

info(strfmt("Done updating %1", counter));

Notexists join:

updateCounter = 10;
while select forupdate log
    order by CreatedDateTime, RecId
    notexists join databaseLogFixLog
    where databaseLogFixLog.RefRecId == log.RecId
{
    counter++;

    if (counter > updateCount)
        break;

    info(strfmt("%1", counter));
}

info(strfmt("Done updating %1", counter));
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your two joins are not equivalent, your outer join is just plain wrong.

You exists join will work, but it will have to sort your log records (3.7 million), witch will take some time. Also it have to check for the whether you logFixLog record exist (for each of the 3.7 million), you will need an index on the RefRecId field to speed things up.

If you want speed then remove the order by clause.

You could also try the adding the firstfast keyword, it will sometimes giver faster initial results (but rarely if combined with order by).

Finally, select the fields you want to update, especially avoid the container field as this field is not stored with the other fields.

share|improve this answer
    
The outer join was a weak attempt to get ANY results to return, as the query was just locked up. I didn't even think of removing the "order by" because I just ripped part of the query from Forms\SysDatabaseLog\buildContents. That got the query time down to 83 seconds for 10 records. I put the "firstFast" and it got it to 0 seconds! Brilliant! Unfortunately, I'm trying to update the containers, as an AX 3 to AX 2009 upgrade left date in them instead of utcDateTime, so it causes the DB log to error all over. We want to correct the data to prevent future 2012 issues – Alex Kwitny Aug 8 '12 at 19:05
    
Why upgrade the SysDatabaseLog data in the first place? I usually truncate the table before upgrading. – Jan B. Kjeldsen Aug 9 '12 at 9:25
    
I'm at a SOX compliant company where they use the DB log for audit purposes. I think they usually like 5 years of data...not my place to truncate though unfortunately. – Alex Kwitny Aug 9 '12 at 16:13

I don't think I would loop through such a huge dataset with the "forupdate" keyword, but rather use one table buffer for looping (log) and another one for updating (logUpdate).

I can imagine the system hangs while it loops through 3.7 mill records, and while it is running the query, you'll have to wait until it finally steps inside the while-select.

Also, make sure the RefRecId has an index on the table, so the database engine doesn't run a full table scan trying to find a row in databaseLogFixLog.

share|improve this answer
    
How do you recommend using a logUpdate table for updating? Inside the loop? I'm scanning and updating nested containers [[...],[updated],[updated]] so I'd think if I read the container and determined it needed updated, the best time to update would be immediately after reading it. During an upgrade from AX 3 to AX 2009, the database log has date stored in it, and it needs to be updated to utcDateTime. – Alex Kwitny Aug 8 '12 at 18:57
    
Yea. I saw your blogpost. :-) As for the looping on one buffer, and updating on another, I often use that unless I am changing any of the values the loop is dependent on. At least if I am looping over a huge dataset. I guess it also depends on whether or not you want to avoid locking the entire dataset while you're updating it. In production code, you don't want to lock up too much data for too long. – Skaue Aug 9 '12 at 6:56
    
I see what you're saying. In this case, I wrote a class that basically does batches of 5000 rows, and repeats until it's upgraded the entire log. We want to process/lock it on weekends until it's done since it's a one time thing. – Alex Kwitny Aug 9 '12 at 16:10

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