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i need to simplify this query because the server that hold mysql can't do it in the time limit setted.

SELECT `B`.*,
       `C`.`name`,
       DATE_ADD(`B`.`SAILING-DATE`, INTERVAL `B`.`NIGHTS` DAY) AS dataEnd 

FROM `table1` AS B 
INNER JOIN `table2` AS A 
INNER JOIN `table3` AS C

WHERE `B`.`ID`=`A`.`ID` 
AND `B`.`CAT`=`A`.`CAT` 
AND `C`.`code`=`A`.`code`
AND (`B`.`NIGHTS`>=$aNumber AND `B`.`NIGHTS`<=$anotherNumber) 
// where are other AND like this on `table1`

Where table1 and table2 has about 25.000 rows.

I thought to suddivide the query executing a first query on table1, than loop all the result and make a single query for every result, but i think is too inefficient.

can someone help me? thanks!!!

EDIT:

THIS IS THE EXPLAIN:

enter image description here

EDIT2:

I CAN'T ADD INDEX CAUSE THE FIELD ID, CAT and code are not unique in every table.. in each there are more rows with same ID CAT and code

EDIT3:

I think is better to divide all into subquery more simple.. can someone give me an idea? thanks!

share|improve this question
    
You don't need the (..) in the last line, and I don't see any optimization other then indexing relevant columns. but I'm a rookie... –  alfasin Aug 7 '12 at 23:09
    
there are other AND like the last... i loop through result of form and if some parameters are added i add in query.. like if(isset($someParameters)){$sql = $sql."AND OTHER THINGS";} :) i'm rookie too! :D –  JackTurky Aug 7 '12 at 23:11
1  
Indices probably won't solve your problems. Try doing this as 3 different queries (1 to get what you need from table1, 1 on table2, 1 on table3). Do the filtering (the stuff in the WHERE) in PHP. Joins are slow when used haphazardly. –  Rafe Kettler Aug 7 '12 at 23:12
1  
Can you show the query execution plan by running EXPLAIN *YOUR_FULL_QUERY_HERE* and post the results? Most likely you just need an index on B.NIGHTS to make it efficient. –  drew010 Aug 7 '12 at 23:12
1  
The values in the columns don't need to be unique for an index - in fact, that's better, as it will "group" together the same values so when selecting them, it will be able to locate them more easily. –  dash Aug 7 '12 at 23:24

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One thing you can try is the following:

SELECT `B`.*, 
       `C`.`name`, 
       DATE_ADD(`B`.`SAILING-DATE`, INTERVAL `B`.`NIGHTS` DAY) AS dataEnd  

FROM (SELECT * 
         FROM `table1` 
         WHERE table1.NIGHTS >=$aNumber AND table1.NIGHTS <=$anotherNumber) AS B  
INNER JOIN `table2` AS A  ON `B`.`ID`=`A`.`ID` AND `B`.`CAT`=`A`.`CAT`
INNER JOIN `table3` AS C  ON `A`.`code` = `C`.`code`

This will effectively prefilter the rows in table1 by only selecting those with Nights fulfilling your required criteria reducing the number involved in joins on the other tables.

Also note that your JOIN conditions should be after the INNER JOIN using ON - you effectively have no need of the WHERE clause in this instance.

One other thing you should investigate is the query plan - see the EXPLAIN command for more information.

In this instance, you may benefit from an index on the ID, CAT, and CODE columns, but, rather than just add an index to everything, examine the output from EXPLAIN first to see where the best savings are - adding indexes will have a cost when you insert data.

EDIT:

Okay, so the subquery performs well, but you are worried about the situation where you can't prefilter table1. First things first, let's revise your original query, and try that:

SELECT B.*, 
       C.name, 
       DATE_ADD(B.SAILING-DATE, INTERVAL B.NIGHTS DAY) AS dataEnd  

FROM table1 AS B  
INNER JOIN table2 AS A  ON (B.ID=A.ID AND B.CAT=A.CAT)
INNER JOIN table3 AS C  ON (A.code = C.code)

I wonder if the odd formatting of your original query (the join conditions should really follow the table you are joining on) are confusing MySql in some way. I've also removed the back-ticks as they aren't needed and, in my opinion, make the query much harder to read (and type).

If performance is not what you expect, please post the results of SHOW INDEX on table1 and table2. It may be that adding an index on the combination of ID and CAT in table1 and ID and CAT in table2 (a composite index) may improve your performance here.

share|improve this answer
    
good answer.. but problems of my query are the JOIN... –  JackTurky Aug 7 '12 at 23:14
    
se eedit for explain –  JackTurky Aug 7 '12 at 23:18
    
Have you tried the above query? It would be interesting to see the EXPLAIN EXTENDED information - dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/explain-extended.html on it. In your question, you also mention some additional items in the WHERE clause - what are they? You can also put these into the subquery in my answer to further reduce the rows. –  dash Aug 7 '12 at 23:22
    
EXPLAIN EXTENDED add only fileterd coloumn to the result in my edit with value 100.00 in every row –  JackTurky Aug 7 '12 at 23:24
    
the problem is the JOIN, cause if i execute query in my question, my problem remain –  JackTurky Aug 7 '12 at 23:26

Start by putting the join conditions in the joins, to help the database make the correct interpretation of the query. This will probably not make a performance difference, but at least the query will be easier to interpret for humans.

You don't need backticks around the alias names in the query. You don't have them everywhere now, so be consistent and add them everywhere, or remove them.

SELECT B.*,
       C.`name`,
       DATE_ADD(B.`SAILING-DATE`, INTERVAL B.`NIGHTS` DAY) AS dataEnd 

FROM `table1` AS B 
INNER JOIN `table2` AS A ON B.`ID`=A.`ID` AND B.`CAT`=A.`CAT`
INNER JOIN `table3` AS C ON C.`code`=A.`code`
WHERE (B.`NIGHTS`>=$aNumber AND B.`NIGHTS`<=$anotherNumber)

Then make sure that you have indexes that the query can use, like on table2.NIGHTS. You can use the explain command to determine which indexes are used by the query.

share|improve this answer
    
see edit for explain –  JackTurky Aug 7 '12 at 23:17

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