Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I know the following makefile will have the pre-processor automatically generate dependencies (in .d files) and include them in the makefile (because my course notes say so), so that they do not have to be automatically maintained. The -MMD flag is what's responsible for this. What I don't get is: At what point are the .d files generated? There isn't even any command where ${CXXFLAGS} is used. Presumably, commands like ${CXX} ${CXXFLAGS} -c x.C -o x.o will be automatically deduced by make for each of the object files, but if these are the commands that generate the .d files, wouldn't we have already passed the point where knowing the dependencies of x.o, y.o and z.o could've been relevant, if we only know them by executing the commands that generate these .o files? (Say there are .h files that the makefile would ignore if left to deduce the rules on its own or something.)

CXX = g++                     # compiler
CXXFLAGS = -g -Wall -MMD      # compiler flags
OBJECTS = x.o y.o z.o         # object files forming executable
DEPENDS = ${OBJECTS:.o=.d}    # substitutes ".o" with ".d"
EXEC = a.out                  # executable name

${EXEC} : ${OBJECTS}          # link step
    ${CXX} ${OBJECTS} -o ${EXEC}

-include ${DEPENDS}           # copies files x.d, y.d, z.d (if they exist)
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Presumably, commands like ${CXX} ${CXXFLAGS} -c x.C -o x.o will be automatically deduced by make for each of the object files, but if these are the commands that generate the .d files, wouldn't we have already passed the point where knowing the dependencies of x.o, y.o and z.o could've been relevant, if we only know them by executing the commands that generate these .o files?

You're correct here. The dependencies aren't present the first time the Makefile is run.

But this doesn't matter - the dependency information is only needed when .o files are already present, and you've changed a .h file. The first time you run Make, all .o files will need to be built anyway, and the .d files are generated at the same time.

After that, the .d files will give dependency information. If a header is changed, the dependency information will tell Make which .o files need rebuilding. If a source file is changed, the .o will always need to be rebuilt, and updated dependency information will be generated at the same time.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.