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In my example code below, is the counter = 0 really required, or is there a better, more Python, way to get access to a loop counter? I saw a few PEPs related to loop counters, but they were either deferred or rejected (PEP 212 and PEP 281).

This is a simplified example of my problem. In my real application this is done with graphics and the whole menu has to be repainted each frame. But this demonstrates it in a simple text way that is easy to reproduce.

Maybe I should also add that I'm using Python 2.5, although I'm still interested if there is a way specific to 2.6 or higher.

# Draw all the options, but highlight the selected index
def draw_menu(options, selected_index):
    counter = 0
    for option in options:
        if counter == selected_index:
            print " [*] %s" % option
        else:
            print " [ ] %s" % option
        counter += 1


options = ['Option 0', 'Option 1', 'Option 2', 'Option 3']

draw_menu(option, 2) # Draw menu with "Option2" selected

When run, it outputs:

 [ ] Option 0
 [ ] Option 1
 [*] Option 2
 [ ] Option 3
share|improve this question
    
can you simply use the array length property instead of the for in loop method, for i < array.length? –  Jim Jul 26 '09 at 21:08
1  
It appears that you have omitted a statement incrementing the value of 'counter' –  Brandon E Taylor Jul 26 '09 at 21:09
1  
Oops, your are correct, thanks Brandon, fixed now –  Andre Miller Jul 26 '09 at 21:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 134 down vote accepted

Use enumerate() like so:

def draw_menu(options, selected_index):
    for counter, option in enumerate(options):
        if counter == selected_index:
            print " [*] %s" % option
        else:
            print " [ ] %s" % option    

options = ['Option 0', 'Option 1', 'Option 2', 'Option 3']
draw_menu(options, 2)

Note: You can optionally put parenthesis around counter, option, like (counter, option), if you want, but they're extraneous and not normally included.

share|improve this answer
20  
The parens around (counter, option) aren't necessary and are usually omitted. –  Adam Rosenfield Jul 26 '09 at 21:14
11  
True. I added parenthesis because it makes more clear for me, but maybe others feel differently. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 26 '09 at 21:16
    
This is a great little method of quickly getting some index values.... THANKS! –  DogEatDog Nov 20 '12 at 19:10
    
you can write in this way: code for counter,option in enumerate(options): –  Abdul Majeed Sep 15 at 9:06
    
For future readers confused about the comments - I edited the answer to remove the parenthesis that the comments are talking about and added in a note instead. –  ArtOfWarfare Oct 17 at 12:53

You could also do:

 for option in options:
      if option == options[selected_index]:
           #print
      else:
           #print

Although you'd run into issues if there are duplicate options.

share|improve this answer
3  
Or if options is an iterator. –  Glenn Maynard Jul 26 '09 at 21:23

I'll sometimes do this:

def draw_menu(options, selected_index):
    for i in range(len(options)):
        if i == selected_index:
            print " [*] %s" % options[i]
        else:
            print " [ ] %s" % options[i]

Though I tend to avoid this if it means I'll be saying options[i] more than a couple of times.

share|improve this answer
2  
In such a case you should always use enumerate() –  Georg Schölly Jul 26 '09 at 21:35
    
gs, what if you only need to get the element every once in a while, but you need the index every time? It seems like in those situations this could be beneficial because you aren't creating a new variable each time. –  Evan Fosmark Jul 26 '09 at 21:43
1  
@gs: yes. That answer was already posted though, so I was posting an alternate solution. As usual, which answer is best depends on the details of your situation. –  Laurence Gonsalves Jul 26 '09 at 21:58
    
@EvanFosmark - There's absolutely no performance difference between the two. I checked both with the following: python -m timeit "s = 'String used for testing'; ''.join(str(i)+str(c) for i, c in enumerate(s))" and python -m timeit "s = 'String used for testing'; ''.join(str(i)+str(s[i]) for i in xrange(len(s)))". Each of them averaged on 8.83 usec per loop over 100,000 loops. Other tests (too long for a comment) showed very slight (~2%) speed increases for xrange(len(s)) if it only needed to access the element on every 16 iterations. –  ArtOfWarfare Oct 15 at 18:48

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