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a* means zero or more instances of: a right?

so why does $_ = "a"; s/a*/e/g produce: ee

Possible answer: it's replacing the string: "a" with: "e" and it's replacing the empty string: "" with: "e" as well. Or it's replacing the mere absence of a letter: a with a letter: e or it's replacing "zero occurrences" of: a with an: e

Ok then, but:

$_ = "b"; s/a*/e/g produces: ebe

It seems to be replacing the empty string to the left of: b and also the empty string to the right of: b

OK. But then why doesn't it do that for: "a" ? Why doesn't it replace the empty string to the left of: a and also the empty string to the right of: a and also the letter: a itself to get: eee ?

There are just as many zero occurrences of: a on the left side as the right side!

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There's an entire section in perlre for this. –  brian d foy Aug 9 '12 at 20:53
    
$_ = "a"; s/a*/e/g should have been written $_ = "a"; s/a+/e/g –  Brad Gilbert Aug 13 '12 at 17:14
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5 Answers 5

Your analysis of why the results are "ee" and "ebe" are completely accurate.

"/g" modifyer causes the regex to match once, and then try to match again from where the last match stopped.

The reason for the discrepancy (it doesn't replace the empty string to the left of "a") is that is because "*" is greedy - it matches the MOST possible characters. From perldoc perlre :

By default, a quantified subpattern is "greedy", that is, it will match as many times as possible (given a particular starting location) while still allowing the rest of the pattern to match.

So it matches zero "a"s, and sees if it can match more. Since there are more "a"s in the string, it will match one more. Try to match more. None? Done. So we match the first "a".

Then, "/g" causes us to try to match again (starting from where we stopped after last match completed), which now matches empty (zero "a"s) string.

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So it matches zero "a"s, and sees if it can match more. Since there are more "a"s in the string, it will match one more. Try to match more. None? "Great that's exactly what I was looking for - zero occurences of a". What you seem to be saying is that once it has matched the a, it stops looking for zero occurences of: a Why does it stop? is it to do with "eagerness"? –  Literat Aug 8 '12 at 0:11
    
@Literat once it has matched the a, it's advanced to a new position in the string. –  hobbs Aug 8 '12 at 0:21
    
ok. So it matches the a and advances past the a, so why does it stop looking for zero occurences of a i.e. why doesn't it make a 3rd replacement and come up with: eee ? –  Literat Aug 8 '12 at 0:32
    
@Literat: Because it won't repeat the match from the same place. At the start of the string the pattern matches a and moves the pointer on one character to the end of the string. It tries the match again and matches the null string, leaving the pointer where it is. It doesn't try a third time because neither the position nor the pointer have changed –  Borodin Aug 8 '12 at 3:01
    
so your saying it matches the a and the empty string after the a to get 2 e's. Ok, but there are 2 empty strings - one before the a and one after. You feel it doesn't match the empty string before the a. Why not? It should match both strings imo to get 3 e's. –  Literat Aug 9 '12 at 21:45
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Using Damian Conway's excellent Regexp::Debugger, I tried this:

perl -MRegexp::Debugger -E '$_ = "a"; s/a*/e/g; say'

And got this output, in case it makes things any clearer, shown in event logging mode. The first pass match running through the replacement yields this set of events:

a               | a*              |   Starting regex match
a               | a*              |     Trying a literal character zero-or-more times (as many as possible)
                | a*              |     Matched
                |                 |   Regex matched in 3 steps

This is showing that the "a" is matched the first time, which gets replaced by "e".

After completing the match the first time, the debugger lets me run a second match from the same program:

                | <~~             |   Back-tracking in regex
                | a*              |   Back-tracked and restarting regex match
                | a*              |     Trying a literal character zero-or-more times (as many as possible)
                | a*              |     Matched
                |                 |   Regex matched in 3 steps

This is showing that the "" after the original "a" (now "e") is matched the second time and replaced with "e".

Unfortunately, either I don't know how to read the output or Regexp::Debugger gets confused at this point or something, but it repeats again, but doesn't do a replacement.

                | <~~             |   Back-tracking in regex
                | a*              |   Back-tracked and restarting regex match
                | a*              |     Trying a literal character zero-or-more times (as many as possible)
                | a*              |     Matched
                |                 |   Regex matched in 3 steps

Anyway, either Perl has matched a third time and decides for some reason not to do a replacement this time or Regexp::Debugger or I am just confused.

Edit: I solved my confusion by reviewing perldoc perlre:

"The higher-level loops preserve an additional state between iterations: whether the last match was zero-length. To break the loop, the following match after a zero-length match is prohibited to have a length of zero. This prohibition interacts with backtracking (see "Backtracking"), and so the second best match is chosen if the best match is of zero length."

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First, as people have said, a* is greedy; it won't match the empty string if it could match "a" instead. Second, a /g match will match as many times as possible, but it won't make a zero-length match two times in a row in the same position., since that means that the pattern isn't progressing. The pattern is forced to make some other non-zero-length match if it can, or else fail.

When running s/a*/e/g on "a", first a* matches "a" at position 0 (and advances to position 1), so the "a" is replaced with "e". Then a* matches the empty string at position 1 (and doesn't advance), so "" is replaced with "e". Now we're still at position 1, and a* is forbidden from matching the empty string again, and can't match anything longer, so the pattern fails and perl tries to advance to the next character in the string. But we've reached end-of-string, so the output is "ee".

When running s/a*/e/g on "b", first a* matches the empty string at position 0 (and doesn't advance), replacing "" with "e". Then, another match at position 0 is forbidden, so the pattern advances to position 1 (passing over "b" which is not replaced). Then a* matches the empty string at position 1, and replaces it with "e"; and again, it's forbidden to match twice in the same position and perl can't advance beyond the end of the string, so the result is "ebe".

Finally, imagine running s/a*/e/g on "ab". a* matches "aa" at position 0, replaces with "e", and advances to position 2; a* matches empty string at position 2, replaces with "e" and doesn't advance; a* can't make a non-empty match and fails; "b" is scanned over; a* matches the empty string at position 3, replaces with "e" and doesn't advance; end of string. So the result is "eebe", as perl will confirm.

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+1 for "same position" –  DVK Aug 8 '12 at 10:31
    
Yeah Perls says: eebe Ok it starts to make sense to me, but I don't get your explanation in the 4th paragraph. It doesn't match "aa" at position 0 imo. imo the string "ab" consists of ""."a".""."b"."" in other words: empty string (at position 0), "a" (at pos 1), empty string (at pos 3), "b" (at pos 4), empty string at (pos 5). It ignores the first empty string (it seems) because of greed like you say. It then replaces: "a" with: "e", then replaces: "" with: "e", skips the "b", then replaces the final: "" with: "e" and ends up with: "eebe" –  Literat Aug 9 '12 at 22:08
    
I think you have given perhaps the best answer, but please could you expand on this: ""a* is greedy; it won't match the empty string if it could match "a" instead." I don't quite get it. Any other examples/quotes? –  Literat Aug 9 '12 at 23:31
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You think it's inconsistent because you think it replaces "the empty string at pos 0" when it's actually replacing "the sequences of 'a's at pos 0". You shouldn't be surprised that the sequence is longer when the input is a as compared to b.

$_ = "a"; s/a*/e/g:

  1. Try at pos 0: Match 1 char at pos 0. Pos = 1.
  2. Try at pos 1: Match 0 char at pos 1. Pos = 1.
  3. Try at pos 1: Match 0 char at pos 1. Oops, already did that, so fail at that position. Pos = 2.

$_ = "b"; s/a*/e/g:

  1. Try at pos 0: Match 0 char at pos 0. Pos = 0.
  2. Try at pos 0: Match 0 char at pos 0. Oops, already did that, so fail at that position. Pos = 1.
  3. Try at pos 1: Match 0 char at pos 1. Pos = 1.
  4. Try at pos 1: Match 0 char at pos 1. Oops, already did that, so fail at that position. Pos = 2.

If you want to match an empty string at pos 0, you'll have to ask it to do so.

>perl -E"say 'a' =~ s/^|a*/e/gr;"
eee

>perl -E"say 'b' =~ s/^|a*/e/gr;"
ebe
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but wwhyy? You agree there is an empty string at the beginning of "a" just like there is an empty string at the beginning of "b". Perl ignores one but not the other. Seems a bit inconsistent. It works fine, but as soon as you put an a in there, it says "nope I'm not doing it". What's so terrible about having "a" afterwards? It's nice! –  Literat Aug 9 '12 at 23:27
    
Yes, You've just repeated what you already said. I already explained why it's wrong. Not sure what you want me to reply. –  ikegami Aug 10 '12 at 2:17
    
You're not trying to match an empty string. You're trying to match sequences of "a"s. I don't know why you're surprised that the sequence is longer when the input is a as compared to b. –  ikegami Aug 10 '12 at 2:20
    
'a' =~ s/a*/e/rg shouldn't give eee anymore than 'aa' =~ s/a*/e/rg should give eeeee. –  ikegami Aug 10 '12 at 2:22
    
please explain why "sequences of a's" means an empty string + "a" and not "a" + an empty string. –  Literat Aug 19 '12 at 5:50
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Very curious. Using Perl 5.12.1 on RHEL 5, the output is indeed as shown:

$ perl -e '$_ = "a"; s/a*/e/g; print "$_\n";'
ee
$

The best guess (reason) I can come up with is that the a* first matches the a, yielding the first e, and then matches the empty string after the a, for the second e. Let's try some variants:

$ perl -e '$_ = "a"; s/^a*/e/g; print "$_\n";'
e
$ perl -e '$_ = "a"; s/a*$/e/g; print "$_\n";'
ee
$ perl -e '$_ = "a"; s/a+/e/g; print "$_\n";' 
e
$

The first and third of these variations produce the answers I'd expect. The second does puzzle me, still.

$ perl -e '$_ = "a\n"; s/a*/e/g; print "$_\n";'
ee
e
$

Hmmm...

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This is correct. The given regex matches the input twice during a global replacement. –  zostay Aug 7 '12 at 23:52
    
that's a good one - add an anchor ^ at the beginning and it produces a single e –  Literat Aug 8 '12 at 0:24
    
$_ = "a"; s/a*$/e/g is no different from your first case. $ is a zero-width pattern matching the end of the string. The pattern first matches a followed by the end of the string, then the null string followed by the end of the string. As for $_ = "a\n"; s/a*/e/g $ matches the end of the line (or before newline at the end). So the pattern matches a followed by a newline, then the null string followed by a newline, then a null string after a newline. –  Borodin Aug 8 '12 at 3:11
    
Yeah, it makes sense to me: "a\n" should become: "ee\ne". "a\n" has 3 null strings (beginning, middle, and end) but it ignores the 1st one (perhaps due to greed). Similarly "a\t" should become "ee\te". So why does that: ^ anchor in: s/^a*/e/g give a different result? "a" consists of "" at position 0, "a" at position 1, "" at position 2. The "" at position 0 is ignored. The "a" is replaced. It looks at the 2nd "" and decides it isn't at the beginning of the string (because it's after the: "a" ) and therefore ignores it. The finished string is therefore: "e" Similarly "abc" would become: "e" –  Literat Aug 9 '12 at 22:49
    
sorry I mean "ebc" - just one replacement (the "a" itself) even though "abc" has 4 null strings - the 1st one is ignored and the other 3 aren't at the beginning of the string. (I think this is how it works). –  Literat Aug 9 '12 at 23:06
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