Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to know if either of these rely on undefined behaviour, and/or if they can be adapted so that they do not:

Example 1:

var str = {
  ver: '1.01',
  verdesc: 'WIP',
  composite: {
    version_block: str.ver + str.verdesc
  }
}

Example 2:

var str = {
  ver: '1.01',
  verdesc: 'WIP',
},
composite: {
  version_block: str.ver + str.verdesc
};
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by casperOne Aug 9 '12 at 13:02

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
You haven't even tried to execute that code... :-/ –  Šime Vidas Aug 8 '12 at 1:41
    
agree with slime, downvoting because you could have verified this in 1 second –  Andy Ray Aug 8 '12 at 1:46
    
If the code ran or did not run, it does not tell me whether it is undefined behaviour. In some languages the order that expressions are evaluated can vary depending on the implementation. –  Rob F Aug 8 '12 at 1:47
    
If your examples worked, both would have different values. In your first example, composite is a property of str. In your second, composite would be a separate variable altogether. What are you trying to accomplish? –  Ian Hunter Aug 8 '12 at 1:48
    
The point is that I don't really care of composite is a separate variable or a member of str, though I'd prefer the latter. I presented the examples as a way of saying "If 1st version doesn't work, does the second?" Yes, I didn't run the code, I just typed it out now into the web form, and yes it would yield a syntax error which is an irrelevent mishap on my part, and even if I had tested it it would not have answered my question, so stop punishing me for that. –  Rob F Aug 8 '12 at 1:50
show 2 more comments

2 Answers 2

You are trying to reference a property that is defined via an object literal, from within the object literal itself. This is not possible. The properties are assigned to the str variable only after the entire object literal is evaluated. So, within the object literal, you cannot refer to properties of str.

So, when you assign an object literal to a variable,

var obj = { ... };

then, inside that object literal, you cannot use the obj reference at all. At the time the object literal is evaluated, obj is still undefined, and only after the object literal has been fully parsed and evaluated, the corresponding Object value is created, and assigned to obj.

var obj = {
    a: 123,
    b: obj.a // this will throw, "obj" is undefined
};
obj.b = obj.a; // this works
share|improve this answer
add comment

http://jsfiddle.net/kendfrey/XwVFt/

The error message explains it all.

You can't do that. The properties of the variable are not accessible until the variable is assigned, which happens after the whole object has been created.

You can work around this by assigning the object, and then setting its properties.

var str = { };
str.ver = '1.01';
str.verdesc = 'WIP';
str.composite = {
  version_block: str.ver + str.verdesc
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.