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How can I best handle a situation like the following?

I have a constructor that takes a while to complete.

var Element = function Element(name){
   this.name = name;
   this.nucleus = {};

   this.load_nucleus(name); // This might take a second.
}

var oxygen = new Element('oxygen');
console.log(oxygen.nucleus); // Returns {}, because load_nucleus hasn't finished.

I see three options, each of which seem out of the ordinary.

One, add a callback to the constructor.

var Element = function Element(name, fn){
   this.name = name;
   this.nucleus = {};

   this.load_nucleus(name, function(){
      fn(); // Now continue.
   });
}

Element.prototype.load_nucleus(name, fn){
   fs.readFile(name+'.json', function(err, data) {
      this.nucleus = JSON.parse(data); 
      fn();
   });
}

var oxygen = new Element('oxygen', function(){  
   console.log(oxygen.nucleus);
});

Two, use EventEmitter to emit a 'loaded' event.

var Element = function Element(name){
   this.name = name;
   this.nucleus = {};

   this.load_nucleus(name); // This might take a second.
}

Element.prototype.load_nucleus(name){
   var self = this;
   fs.readFile(name+'.json', function(err, data) {
      self.nucleus = JSON.parse(data); 
      self.emit('loaded');
   });
}

util.inherits(Element, events.EventEmitter);

var oxygen = new Element('oxygen');
oxygen.on('loaded', function(){
   console.log(this.nucleus);
});

Or three, block the constructor.

var Element = function Element(name){
   this.name = name;
   this.nucleus = {};

   this.load_nucleus(name); // This might take a second.
}

Element.prototype.load_nucleus(name, fn){
   this.nucleus = JSON.parse(fs.readFileSync(name+'.json'));
}

var oxygen = new Element('oxygen');
console.log(oxygen.nucleus)

But I haven't seen any of this done before.

What other options do I have?

share|improve this question
    
Blocking the constructor means blocking everything, so I probably wouldn't do that. –  josh3736 Aug 8 '12 at 2:22
    
Options 1, and 2 are effectively the same approach. You pass a load handler to the constructor, and that handler is triggered from within the readFile callback. This is how event-based programming works (which is what JavaScript/Node is). You can use option 1, or 2, or any other variation on the theme, but effectively you get the same asynchronous behavior. –  Šime Vidas Aug 8 '12 at 2:42
    
I learnt much more things from this "question" than given answers. +1 for "informative question"! –  scaryguy Feb 9 at 0:13
    
Just one things. Use .once() not .on() for this case. It's sementically better :). –  Cyril ALFARO Feb 16 at 23:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Given the necessity to avoid blocking in Node, the use of events or callbacks isn't so strange(1).

With a slight edit of Two, you could merge it with One:

var Element = function Element(name, fn){
    this.name = name;
    this.nucleus = {};

    if (fn) this.on('loaded', fn);

    this.load_nucleus(name); // This might take a second.
}

...

Though, like the fs.readFile in your example, the core Node APIs (at least) often follow the pattern of static functions that expose the instance when the data is ready:

var Element = function Element(name, nucleus) {
    this.name = name;
    this.nucleus = nucleus;
};

Element.create = function (name, fn) {
    fs.readFile(name+'.json', function(err, data) {
        var nucleus = err ? null : JSON.parse(data);
        fn(err, new Element(name, nucleus));
    });
};

Element.create('oxygen', function (err, elem) {
    if (!err) {
        console.log(elem.name, elem.nucleus);
    }
});

(1) It shouldn't take very long to read a JSON file. If it is, perhaps a change in storage system is in order for the data.

share|improve this answer

One thing you could do is preload all the nuclei (maybe inefficient; I don't know how much data it is). The other, which I would recommend if preloading is not an option, would involve a callback with a cache to save loaded nuclei. Here is that approach:

Element.nuclei = {};

Element.prototype.load_nucleus = function(name, fn){
   if ( name in Element.nuclei ) {
       this.nucleus = Element.nuclei[name];
       return fn();
   }
   fs.readFile(name+'.json', function(err, data) {
      this.nucleus = Element.nuclei[name] = JSON.parse(data); 
      fn();
   });
}
share|improve this answer

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