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I lookup my git logs and find that the AuthorDate and CommitDate is slightly different for some of my commits:

commit 3a5912f90dc5227f308e99f95152fbee2301c59a
Author:     <hidden>
AuthorDate: Fri Jun 15 10:57:22 2012 +0800
Commit:     <hidden>
CommitDate: Fri Jun 15 11:14:37 2012 +0800

The Author and Commit is the same me.

How does this happen? I am puzzled for days.

There are more(happens in 17 out of 341 commits):

+------------------------------+-------------------------------+
| from_unixtime(authored_date) | from_unixtime(committed_date) |
+------------------------------+-------------------------------+
| 2012-06-15 10:57:22          | 2012-06-15 11:14:37           |
| 2012-06-15 14:39:54          | 2012-06-15 14:48:57           |
| 2012-06-19 12:28:21          | 2012-06-19 12:29:41           |
| 2012-06-21 18:16:25          | 2012-06-21 18:28:48           |
| 2012-06-26 17:30:54          | 2012-06-26 17:33:55           |
| 2012-07-13 11:41:43          | 2012-07-13 11:42:17           |
| 2012-07-13 11:56:02          | 2012-07-13 12:13:22           |
| 2012-07-13 12:05:09          | 2012-07-13 12:12:24           |
| 2012-07-12 18:38:49          | 2012-07-13 12:26:35           |
| 2012-07-13 11:00:47          | 2012-07-13 12:25:15           |
| 2012-07-16 14:10:54          | 2012-07-16 14:15:01           |
| 2012-07-13 12:56:51          | 2012-07-16 13:49:48           |
| 2012-07-16 14:10:54          | 2012-07-16 14:19:46           |
| 2012-07-24 16:05:05          | 2012-07-24 16:05:48           |
| 2012-07-24 17:42:58          | 2012-07-24 17:43:33           |
| 2012-07-24 17:42:58          | 2012-07-24 17:45:18           |
| 2012-07-26 16:55:40          | 2012-07-26 16:55:53           |
+------------------------------+-------------------------------+
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Hmm, it seems like happening when merging branches. –  fossilet Aug 8 '12 at 3:32
    
Both are helpful. I accept @eckes for he has lower reputation. ;) –  fossilet Aug 8 '12 at 10:05
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2 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

The author date notes when this commit was originally made (i.e. when you finished the git commit). According to the docs of git commit, the author date could be overridden using the --date switch.

The commit date gets changed every time the commit is being modified, for example when rebasing the branch where the commit is in on another branch.

Same could happen if you make your commit and send your patch to another one in order to apply the patch in another repo: the author date will be the date of your git commit, the commit date will be set to that date when the patch is applied in the other repo.

If you send the patch to two colleagues, there will be one author date but two different commit dates.

This is also mentioned in the Git Book:

You may be wondering what the difference is between author and committer. The author is the person who originally wrote the patch, whereas the committer is the person who last applied the patch. So, if you send in a patch to a project and one of the core members applies the patch, both of you get credit — you as the author and the core member as the committer

share|improve this answer
    
Will my case happen when merging branches? –  fossilet Aug 8 '12 at 4:40
1  
No. I believe the date is part of the SHA, so unless you perform some operation that rewrites history, like rebasing, it should not change. –  asmeurer Aug 8 '12 at 4:53
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The author date on a commit is preserved on rebase / cherry-pick etc. But the commit date is changed.

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Some commits in question are not either cherry-picking or rebasing. They look like merging another branch. –  fossilet Aug 8 '12 at 4:39
4  
So does git commit --amend. –  asmeurer Aug 8 '12 at 4:51
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