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My intended program flow would look like the following if it were possible:

typedef struct structure_t
{
  [...]
  /* device function pointer. */
  __device__ float (*function_pointer)(float, float, float[]);
  [...]
} structure;

[...]

/* function to be assigned. */
__device__ float
my_function (float a, float b, float c[])
{
  /* do some stuff on the device. */
  [...]
}

void
some_structure_initialization_function (structure *st)
{
  /* assign. */
  st->function_pointer = my_function;
  [...]
}

This is not possible, and ends in a familiar error during compilation regarding the placement of __device__ in the structure.

 error: attribute "device" does not apply here

There are some examples of similar types of problems here on stackoverflow, but they all involve the use of static pointers outside the structure. Examples are device function pointers as struct members and device function pointers. I've taken a similar approach with success previously in other codes where it's easy for me to use static device pointers and define them outside of any structures. Currently though this is a problem. It's written as an API of sorts and the user may define one or two or dozens of structures which need to include a device function pointer. So, defining static device pointers outside of the structure is a major problem.

I'm fairly certain the answer exists within the posts I have linked above, through use symbol copies, but I've not been able to put them to successful use.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What you are trying to do is possible, but you have made a few mistakes in the way you are declaring and defining the structures that will hold and use the function pointer.

This is not possible, and ends in a familiar error during compilation regarding the placement of __device__ in the structure.

 error: attribute "device" does not apply here

This is only because you are attempting to assign a memory space to a structure or class data member, which is illegal in CUDA. The memory space of the all class or structure data members are implicitly set when you define or instantiate a class. So something only slighlty different (and more concrete):

typedef float (* fp)(float, float, float4);

struct functor
{
    float c0, c1;
    fp f;

    __device__ __host__
    functor(float _c0, float _c1, fp _f) : c0(_c0), c1(_c1), f(_f) {};

    __device__ __host__
    float operator()(float4 x) { return f(c0, c1, x); };
};

__global__
void kernel(float c0, float c1, fp f, const float4 * x, float * y, int N)
{
    int tid = threadIdx.x + blockIdx.x * blockDim.x;

    struct functor op(c0, c1, f);
    for(int i = tid; i < N; i += blockDim.x * gridDim.x) {
        y[i] = op(x[i]);
    }
}

is perfectly valid. The function pointer fp in functor is implicitly a __device__ function when an instance of functor is instantiated in device code. If it were instantiated in host code, the function pointer would implicitly be a host function. In the kernel, a device function pointer passed as argument is used to instantiate a functor instance. All perfectly legal.

I believe I am correct in saying that there is no direct way to get the address of a __device__ function in host code, so you still require some static declarations and symbol manipulation. This might be different in CUDA 5, but I have not tested it to see. If we flesh out the device code above with a couple of __device__ functions and some supporting host code:

__device__ __host__ 
float f1 (float a, float b, float4 c)
{
    return a + (b * c.x) +  (b * c.y) + (b * c.z) + (b * c.w);
}

__device__ __host__
float f2 (float a, float b, float4 c)
{
    return a + b + c.x + c.y + c.z + c.w;
}

__constant__ fp function_table[] = {f1, f2};

int main(void)
{
    const float c1 = 1.0f, c2 = 2.0f;
    const int n = 20;
    float4 vin[n];
    float vout1[n], vout2[n];
    for(int i=0, j=0; i<n; i++) {
        vin[i].x = j++; vin[i].y = j++;
        vin[i].z = j++; vin[i].w = j++;
    }

    float4 * _vin;
    float * _vout1, * _vout2;
    size_t sz4 = sizeof(float4) * size_t(n);
    size_t sz1 = sizeof(float) * size_t(n);
    cudaMalloc((void **)&_vin, sz4);
    cudaMalloc((void **)&_vout1, sz1);
    cudaMalloc((void **)&_vout2, sz1);
    cudaMemcpy(_vin, &vin[0], sz4, cudaMemcpyHostToDevice);

    fp funcs[2];
    cudaMemcpyFromSymbol(&funcs, "function_table", 2 * sizeof(fp));

    kernel<<<1,32>>>(c1, c2, funcs[0], _vin, _vout1, n);
    cudaMemcpy(&vout1[0], _vout1, sz1, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost); 

    kernel<<<1,32>>>(c1, c2, funcs[1], _vin, _vout2, n);
    cudaMemcpy(&vout2[0], _vout2, sz1, cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost); 

    struct functor func1(c1, c2, f1), func2(c1, c2, f2); 
    for(int i=0; i<n; i++) {
        printf("%2d %6.f %6.f (%6.f,%6.f,%6.f,%6.f ) %6.f %6.f %6.f %6.f\n", 
                i, c1, c2, vin[i].x, vin[i].y, vin[i].z, vin[i].w,
                vout1[i], func1(vin[i]), vout2[i], func2(vin[i]));
    }

    return 0;
}

you get a fully compilable and runnable example. Here two __device__ functions and a static function table provide a mechanism for the host code to retrieve __device__ function pointers at runtime. The kernel is called once with each __device__ function and the results displayed, along with the exact same functor and functions instantiated and called from host code (and thus running on the host) for comparison:

$ nvcc -arch=sm_30 -Xptxas="-v" -o function_pointer function_pointer.cu 

ptxas info    : Compiling entry function '_Z6kernelffPFfff6float4EPKS_Pfi' for 'sm_30'
ptxas info    : Function properties for _Z6kernelffPFfff6float4EPKS_Pfi
    16 bytes stack frame, 0 bytes spill stores, 0 bytes spill loads
ptxas info    : Function properties for _Z2f1ff6float4
    24 bytes stack frame, 0 bytes spill stores, 0 bytes spill loads
ptxas info    : Function properties for _Z2f2ff6float4
    24 bytes stack frame, 0 bytes spill stores, 0 bytes spill loads
ptxas info    : Used 16 registers, 356 bytes cmem[0], 16 bytes cmem[3]

$ ./function_pointer 
 0      1      2 (     0,     1,     2,     3 )     13     13      9      9
 1      1      2 (     4,     5,     6,     7 )     45     45     25     25
 2      1      2 (     8,     9,    10,    11 )     77     77     41     41
 3      1      2 (    12,    13,    14,    15 )    109    109     57     57
 4      1      2 (    16,    17,    18,    19 )    141    141     73     73
 5      1      2 (    20,    21,    22,    23 )    173    173     89     89
 6      1      2 (    24,    25,    26,    27 )    205    205    105    105
 7      1      2 (    28,    29,    30,    31 )    237    237    121    121
 8      1      2 (    32,    33,    34,    35 )    269    269    137    137
 9      1      2 (    36,    37,    38,    39 )    301    301    153    153
10      1      2 (    40,    41,    42,    43 )    333    333    169    169
11      1      2 (    44,    45,    46,    47 )    365    365    185    185
12      1      2 (    48,    49,    50,    51 )    397    397    201    201
13      1      2 (    52,    53,    54,    55 )    429    429    217    217
14      1      2 (    56,    57,    58,    59 )    461    461    233    233
15      1      2 (    60,    61,    62,    63 )    493    493    249    249
16      1      2 (    64,    65,    66,    67 )    525    525    265    265
17      1      2 (    68,    69,    70,    71 )    557    557    281    281
18      1      2 (    72,    73,    74,    75 )    589    589    297    297
19      1      2 (    76,    77,    78,    79 )    621    621    313    313

If I have understood your question correctly, the above example should give you pretty much all the design patterns you need to implement your ideas in device code.

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Thanks very much for your detailed reply. This gave me everything I needed to implement my ideas in my code. Already up and running. I will accept this as an answer. –  coastal Aug 8 '12 at 15:08
    
Why did you remove the C tag? –  coastal Aug 8 '12 at 20:15
    
Because this is really a C++ question. Despite being labelled as "CUDA C", the device language is really a subset of C++. Both host and device code are compiled with a C++ compiler and the semantics of structures, pointers and functions follow C++ conventions. –  talonmies Aug 8 '12 at 20:20
    
well that's fine but my code is completely in C and there's nothing from C++ in my question really. if anything it should have both i guess. –  coastal Aug 8 '12 at 20:51
    
@coastal: The rationale is pretty straight forward. You look at those structures in your question and see "plain C". The toolchain you use to compile it is C++ and sees C++ structures containing only data members. The reason for the syntax error you complained about is because C++ semantics apply to those data members. When you write code and compile with the CUDA toolchain, you are writing C++ code, whether you realise it or not. –  talonmies Aug 9 '12 at 9:36

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