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Here is my example classes :

template<typename T> class MyClassVector
{
    public:
        inline const std::vector<T>& data() const
        {
            return _data;
        }

    protected:
        std::vector<T> _data;
};

template<typename T, unsigned int SIZE> class MyClassArray
{
    public:
        inline const /* SOMETHING */ data() const
        {
            return _data; // OR SOMETHING ELSE
        }

    protected:
        T _data[SIZE];
};

My question is : what is the equivalent of the MyClassVector data() function for the MyClassArray class to return a constant reference to the underlying _data container ?

Thank you very much !

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two ways to do this: The direct and the readable:

Direct:

inline T const (& data() const)[SIZE] {
  return _data;
}

Readable:

typedef T Data[Size];
inline Data const& data() const {
  return _data;
}
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Why not just expose the array as pointer to const instance of T? And also the the size of the array?

template<typename T, std::size_t SIZE>
class MyClassArray {
public:
    inline const int* data() const
    {
        return _data;
    }

    inline std::size_t size() const
    {
        return SIZE;
    }

protected:
    std::size_t _data[SIZE];
};

There is an analogous approach: see std::string class, c_str() and size() member functions.

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The closest syntax would be returning a reference to a an array of const T. The simple way of writting that is by means of typedefs:

template <typename T, unsigned int N>
class MyClassArray {
public:
   typedef T array_t[N];
   typedef const T carray_t[N];
   array_t _data;

   carray_t& data() const {
      return _data;
   }
};

The harder to read way is actually spelling the type in the function declaration:

const T (&foo() const)[N] {
   return _data;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Aw, shoot. Now I see your answer. +1, gunslinger. –  bitmask Aug 8 '12 at 4:08
    
@bitmask: Neither of us was precisely fast... +1 to your answer (how can I not agree with myself :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 8 '12 at 4:21

There's no way to do this typesafely since arrays just decay to a pointer. The equivalent would be returning a const pointer, but then the caller has no way to know the size.

Anyway, there's no reason to use raw arrays anymore. Std::array would solve the problem and be much nicer to work with as well.

Edit, nevermind it is possible to pass references to raw arrays (see above). That doesn't mean you should do it though. std::array is better.

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Uh, why was this downvoted? –  Antimony Aug 8 '12 at 3:09
    
I didn't downvote, but it is possible to return a reference to an array; it won't decay automatically. –  Mehrdad Aug 8 '12 at 3:09
    
Oh ok. I didn't realize that. –  Antimony Aug 8 '12 at 3:12
2  
I downvoted because you can, in fact, return a type-safe reference. Sorry it took me a few minutes to explain, I was discovering that I had completely forgotten the syntax. –  Puppy Aug 8 '12 at 3:13
    
@Dead thanks for the explanation. It's really frustrating to get downvoted and have no idea why, or whether anything I said was wrong. Now I've learned something. –  Antimony Aug 8 '12 at 3:27

You can return a const reference to a SIZE sized array of T. I have no idea what the syntax for this is, but you can use type traits to produce it. But more relevantly, you are simply poorly duplicating std::array<T, N>, which can also be found in Boost/TR1, so it's a tad of a waste of time.

#include <type_traits>

class X {
    int arr[5];
    std::add_reference<std::add_const<int[5]>::type>::type foo() {
        return arr;
    }
};

This will return a size-aware const reference to your array.

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The syntax is very ugly: inline const T(&data() const)[SIZE] –  Jesse Good Aug 8 '12 at 3:18
    
That should probably be std::add_lvalue_reference.According to g++4.7 the result will not be what the user wants, but rather int const* --although to be honest I don't quite understand why. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 8 '12 at 4:05
    
Since the int and the 5 are actually template arguments, you'll need two typenames thrown in there. –  bitmask Aug 8 '12 at 4:10
    
Oh, I don't, but the OP would. MSDN doesn't mention a std::add_lvalue_reference. –  Puppy Aug 8 '12 at 4:45
    
@DeadMG: I was reading the standard (n3337, first draft after approved standard, only editorial changes) and there are two add reference metafunctions: add_lvalue_reference and add_rvalue_reference (§20.9.2/§20.9.7.2) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 8 '12 at 11:51

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