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From a speed and efficiency standpoint: which is considered best-practice, create a temporary object or decompose a (possibly temporary) argument object?

In this example the implementations of the functions are mutually exclusive for DRY purposes. Both WILL NOT be implemented as shown, but one will be implemented in terms of the other which will delegate the actual work.

void SetPoints(double xA, double yA, double xB, double yB, double xC, double yC);
void SetPoints(const Point& A, const Point& B, const Point& C);

///Option one: create temporary objects:
void SetPoints(double xA, double yA, double xB, double yB, double xC, double yC) {
    SetPoints(Point(xA, yA), Point(xB, yB), Point(xC, yC));
}

//Option two: decompose object arguments
void SetPoints(const Point& A, const Point& B, const Point& C) {
    SetPoints(A.GetX(), A.GetY(), B.GetX(), B.GetY(), C.GetX(), C.GetY());
}
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Is speed a problem in your program? Have you measured? Do you have hard data from profiling real usage? If not, don't worry too much about performance, the second option will be infinitesimally faster (unless the compiler can inline the whole function), but that should not be the reason to pick one over the other... as a matter of fact, if most of your calls are with Point objects, it might be more efficient to avoid the extra function call (assuming it is not inlined) of decomposing... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Aug 8 '12 at 4:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Overwhelmingly likely to be completely irrelevant. The compiler will likely not even generate different assembly for the two, and even if it did, the performance cost of a tiny thunk would be negligible. There's no reason to even think about this.

The best function is the one that is the most clear/etc, in this case.

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2  
'The Zen of C++' :) –  Aesthete Aug 8 '12 at 4:43

I'd implement only the one that takes Point objects, then create a Point constructor that takes an std::initializer_list, so when you want to pass individual doubles, you can use something like:

SetPoints({xA, yA}, {xB, yB}, {xC, yC});
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