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Basically, this is the last question from an assignment and I'm seriously at a loss. I need to create an x by x matrix of alternating 1's and 0's where x is the user input. An example, if the user inputs 2, the matrix would look as such

0 1
1 0

If the user inputs 4 the matrix would look as such

0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0
0 1 0 1
1 0 1 0

etc... I've scoured stack overflow and other forums, and I understand how to create an array. It's just the alternating 1 and 0 and how to display it as such. Thanks to anyone who has any ideas.

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1  
What have you tried? Give code pls –  Rajeev M Aug 8 '12 at 5:16
    
We don't do homework... cheater ;) But here's a hint: Look into the modulus operator. –  Ayman Safadi Aug 8 '12 at 5:17
    
I'm not asking you to do my homework, just looking for help. Thanks for the hint though, I'm trying something now. No code yet, I'll post what i have soon –  user1584384 Aug 8 '12 at 5:20
    
Another hint: To display an "x by x matrix" on a webpage a <table> element would be appropriate. –  nnnnnn Aug 8 '12 at 5:30
1  
You have been given the answer to your homework problem. Just please attempt to understand the code instead of simply copying and pasting the answer. I've commented my code to aid you in the process, as has Aesthete. JCOC611 has not (at the time of this writing), but I'm sure you'll be able to understand it if you put in the effort. –  jeff Aug 8 '12 at 5:32
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4 Answers

Don't over complicate things. You don't need flags or conditionals like bool, if and ?:. This is extremely simple.

var count = 4; // User specified matrix size
mat = []; // Empty array, to use as matrix.
for(var i=0; i<count; i++) {
    mat.push(new Array(count)); // Add a new row (reserved size) to the matrix
    for(var j=0; j<count; j++) {
       mat[i][j] = (i^j) % 2; // Insert an alternating 1 or 0 based on iteration.
    }
}
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2  
i^j? I prefer i+j ;) –  irrelephant Aug 8 '12 at 5:23
    
Ha true! This was just the first solution that came to mind. –  Aesthete Aug 8 '12 at 5:25
    
Also, less code to use mat.push([]); rather than use the Array constructor. –  RobG Aug 8 '12 at 5:28
2  
+1 for creating the new array with new array. This is always encouraged when you know the final length, this way you don't force the expansion every time you push a new item –  ajax333221 Aug 8 '12 at 5:28
    
mat=[]; should be mat=new Array(count);, and then mat[i]=new Array(count); instead of mat.push(new Array(count)); –  ajax333221 Aug 29 '12 at 20:30
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You can use this function:

function createArray(n) {
    var arr = [];                     // create new array
    var zeroStart = true;             // the first row should start with 0
    for (var i = 0; i < n; i++) {     // loop over n times
        arr[i] = [];                  // used because array is multidimensional
        var zero = zeroStart;         // starting zero should match the row start
        for (var j = 0; j < n; j++) { // again loop over n times
            arr[i][j] = zero ? 0 : 1; // if zero is true, assign 0; otherwise 1
            zero = !zero;             // negate the value of zero
        }
        zeroStart = !zeroStart;       // negate the value of the starting zero
    }
    return arr;                       // return the created array
}

It can be called like this:

createArray(6);                       // create 6x6 array
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The secret is to abstract your code into multiple functions. If you separate the code for creating a row from the code for creating a matrix you will have an easier time wrapping your thinkmatter around what's going on than if you cram everything into one megafunction.

Let's tackle the easier problem first--the creation of a row. It looks like you want control over the length of the returned row as well as the initial value of the first cell, whether that's a one or a zero. This calls for a function that takes two parameters:

function makeMatrixRow(size, initialValue) { }

The code needed turns out to be quite simple:

function makeMatrixRow(size, initialValue) {
    var n = [];

    for (var i = 0, flag = !!initialValue;
             i < size;
             i++, flag = !flag) {
        n.push(0+flag+0);
    }

    return n;
}

I've pushed most of the logic into the for loop's definition. It shouldn't be too hard to deconstruct. The only tricky bits are "!!initialValue" and "0+flag+0". The first converts initialValue into a true/false value (boolean). The second turns this boolean back into a number. Obviously I didn't need to add zero on both sides, but I enjoy the symmetry of it--plus I think it sort of looks like a barbell this way :)

With that function out of the way, generating the matrix is easy. No fiddling with nested loops. The problem has been reduced to simple iteration to fill an array:

function makeMatrix(size) {
    var matrix = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        matrix.push(makeMatrixRow(size, i % 2 == 0));
    }
    return matrix;
}

i % 2 == 0 is testing for evenness. It might be better to split that out into its own variable assignment rather than passing it directly. An extra variable here or there can be an adequate substitute for a comment:

for (var i = 0; i < size; i++) {
    var isEvenRow = (i % 2 == 0);
    matrix.push(makeMatrixRow(size, isEvenRow));
}

And that's it! Altogether now, here's what the code looks like:

function makeMatrixRow(size, initialValue) {
    var n = [];

    for (var i = 0, flag = !!initialValue;
             i < size;
             i++, flag = !flag) {
        n.push(0+flag+0);
    }

    return n;
}


function makeMatrix(size) {
    var matrix = [];
    for (var i = 0; i < size; i++) {
        matrix.push(makeMatrixRow(size, i % 2 == 0));
    }
    return matrix;
}

Even though it's a little longer, I prefer that to a single function solution... But to each their own!

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+1 for the long, detailed explanation. –  jeff Aug 8 '12 at 6:29
    
I'm really grateful for the explanation, this has definitely been helpful. –  user1584384 Aug 8 '12 at 10:35
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function mArray(num){
   var a = [];
   var b = false;
   for(var z=0; z<num; z++){
      a[z] = [];
      b = false;
      for(var i=0; i<num; i++){
         a[z][i] = (b)? 1: 0;
         b = !b;
      }
   }
}

That should work.

mArray(4); // to create a 4x4 array
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