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I would like to move several one liners into a single script.

For example:

perl -i.bak -pE "s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g" Cities.Txt
perl -i.bak -pE "s/Manhattan/New_England/g" Cities.Txt

Above works well for me but at the expense of two disk I/O operations.

I would like to move the aforementioned logic into a single script so that all substitutions are effectuated with the file opened and edited only once.

EDIT1: Based on your recommendations, I wrote this snippet in a script which when invoked from a windows batch file simply hangs:

#!/usr/bin/perl -i.bak -p Cities.Txt
use strict;
use warnings;

while( <> ){
s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g;
s/Manhattan/New_England/g;
print;
}

EDIT2: OK, so here is how I implemented your recommendation. Works like a charm!

Batch file:

perl -i.bal MyScript.pl Cities.Txt

MyScript.pl

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;

while( <> ){
s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g;
s/Manhattan/New_England/g;
print;
}

Thanks a lot to everyone that contributed.

share|improve this question
3  
You do realize that you can use a single one-liner, right? perl -i.bak -pE "s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g;s/Manhattan/New_England/g" Cities.Txt –  ephemient Aug 8 '12 at 5:38
    
Yes, but I have 60+ substitutions to perform and passing them via a command line is not tenable. –  Raj Aug 8 '12 at 8:52

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The -p wraps the argument to -E with:

while( <> ) {
    # argument to -E
    print;
    }

So, take all the arguments to -E and put them in the while:

while( <> ) {
    s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g;
    s/Manhattan/New_England/g;
    print;
    }

The -i sets the $^I variable, which turns on some special magic handling ARGV:

$^I = "bak";

The -E turns on the new features for that versions of Perl. You can do that by just specifying the version:

use v5.10;

However, you don't use anything loaded with that, at least in what you've shown us.

If you want to see everything a one-liner does, put a -MO=Deparse in there:

% perl -MO=Deparse -i.bak -pE "s/Manhattan/New_England/g" Cities.Txt
BEGIN { $^I = ".bak"; }
BEGIN {
    $^H{'feature_unicode'} = q(1);
    $^H{'feature_say'} = q(1);
    $^H{'feature_state'} = q(1);
    $^H{'feature_switch'} = q(1);
}
LINE: while (defined($_ = <ARGV>)) {
    s/Manhattan/New_England/g;
}
continue {
    die "-p destination: $!\n" unless print $_;
}
-e syntax OK
share|improve this answer

You can put arguments on the #! line. Perl will read them, even on Windows.

#!/usr/bin/perl -i.bak -p

s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g;
s/Manhattan/New_England/g;

or you can keep it a one-liner as @ephemient said in the comments.

perl -i.bak -pE "s/String_ABC/String_XYZ/g; s/Manhattan/New_England/g" Cities.Txt

-i + -p basically puts a while loop around your program. Each line comes in as $_, your code runs, and $_ is printed out at the end. Repeat. So you can have as many statements as you want.

share|improve this answer
    
Well, the -p adds the while loop and a print statement. The -i doesn't have anything to do with that, but it does set $^I. –  brian d foy Aug 8 '12 at 6:04
    
Multiple arguments in the shebang line is not portable... although my Perl binary surprises me by dealing with that alright. When did that start happening? –  ephemient Aug 8 '12 at 6:21
    
@ephemient I've never heard of a problem with putting switches on the #! line, been doing it for a long time. Got a citation? Perl pulls switches out of #! itself, has for a long long time, so what the OS does is probably moot. –  Schwern Aug 8 '12 at 6:39
    
it might be when you have #!/usr/bin/env perl <args>. On linux, that attempts to execute a program called "perl <args>". On any other unix variant, it executes perl with the specified args. –  Tom Tanner Aug 8 '12 at 12:59
    
When you have #!/usr/bin/perl -i.bak -p in ./script.pl, Linux will run '/usr/bin/perl' '-i.bak -p' './script.pl' (perfectly acceptable behavior under POSIX). I'm surprised, but a bit of experimentation shows that Perl 5.10.1 on Linux will re-split its arguments on spaces... –  ephemient Aug 9 '12 at 17:16

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