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I have in my application many queries which look like this;

SELECT DISTINCT STREET_NUMBER, STREET_NAME
FROM leads
WHERE STREET_NAME || ',' || SUBURB IN (select VAL from streetFilter)
    AND USER_ID IN (%@)
    AND TIMESTAMP >= '%@'
    AND TIMESTAMP <= '%@'
    AND GEO_LAT <> '0'
ORDER BY STREET_NAME, CAST(`STREET_NUMBER` AS SIGNED) ASC

My question is, which values or sets of values should I be adding an index to.

So far I've just added everything, i.e. CREATE INDEX temp ON leads ('see below')

  1. (STREET_NUMBER, STREET_NAME)
  2. (STREET, SUBURB)
  3. (STREET_NAME || ',' || SUBURB)
  4. (USER_ID)
  5. (TIMESTAMP)
  6. (GEO_LAT)
  7. (STREET, SUBURB, USER_ID, TIMESTAMP, GEO_LAT)
  8. (STREET_NAME || ',' || SUBURB, USER_ID, TIMESTAMP, GEO_LAT)
  9. (STREET_NAME)
  10. (STREET_NUMBER)
  11. (CAST(STREET_NUMBER AS SIGNED))
  12. (STREET_NAME, STREET_NUMBER)
  13. (STREET_NAME, CAST(STREET_NUMBER AS SIGNED))

but I know this can't be right. Can anyone point out which of these won't work or won't make my query any faster and which will??

Database is sqlite

My create statement: @"CREATE TABLE IF NOT EXISTS leads (LEAD_ID BIGINT PRIMARY KEY, USER_ID INTEGER, GEO_LAT, GEO_LONG, CUSTOMER_NAME, UNIT_NUMBER, STREET_NUMBER, STREET_NAME, SUBURB, STATE, POSTCODE INTEGER, NMI, DPI_MIRN, STATUS, STATUS_INT INTEGER, OUTCOME INTEGER, OUTCOME_FULL INTEGER, FINAL_CODE INTEGER, NOTES, NOTES_EXTRA, TIMESTAMP)"];

719130;50;-32.933871;151.774978;Mr David Lee;1;34;LEMNOS PDE;NEWCASTLE;NSW;2300;;;P;0;0;;0;;0:0:0;20120602174036 719233;50;-32.9307183;151.7803428;Mr Mitch James;1;1-7;TYRRELL ST;THE HILL;NSW;2300;;;P;0;0;;0;;0:0:0;20120602174036 719234;50;-32.933155;151.777351;Mr Ben Foster;;4;BINGLE ST;NEWCASTLE;NSW;2300;41021027208;52404368858;C;0;0;;0;;0:0:0;20120602174036 719300;50;-32.9291125;151.785025;Ms Marilyn Rajakulenthiran;U 12;3;KING ST;NEWCASTLE;NSW;2300;;;P;0;0;;0;;0:0:0;20120602174036

Query is now SELECT LEAD_ID, USER_ID, UNIT_NUMBER, STREET_NUMBER, STREET_NAME, SUBURB, STATE, POSTCODE, STATUS_INT, OUTCOME, CUSTOMER_NAME, NOTES FROM leads JOIN outcomeFilter ON leads.OUTCOME = outcomeFilter.VAL JOIN suburbFilter ON leads.SUBPOST = suburbFilter.VAL WHERE USER_ID IN (%@) AND TIMESTAMP BETWEEN '%@' AND '%@' ORDER BY SUBURB, STREET_NAME, CAST(STREET_NUMBER AS SIGNED)

Still no improvement on my initial. Seems to be the order by slowing it down the most

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1  
I'm willing to bet a shiny penny that you'd get some improvement by rewriting that subselect as a join. –  Marc B Aug 8 '12 at 5:39
    
Sorry Marc not this time. My query is now SELECT LEAD_ID, USER_ID, UNIT_NUMBER, STREET_NUMBER, STREET_NAME, SUBURB, STATE, POSTCODE, STATUS_INT, OUTCOME, CUSTOMER_NAME, NOTES FROM leads JOIN outcomeFilter ON leads.OUTCOME = outcomeFilter.VAL JOIN suburbFilter ON leads.SUBPOST = suburbFilter.VAL WHERE USER_ID IN (%@) AND TIMESTAMP BETWEEN '%@' AND '%@' ORDER BY SUBURB, STREET_NAME, CAST(STREET_NUMBER AS SIGNED). I've also tried adding even more indexes, still no faster than when I started. I think alot of the problem is from the ordering at the end. Any ideas? –  davidelias16 Aug 8 '12 at 7:06

3 Answers 3

The best thing to do is to review the query execution plan and check for what suggested indexes are returned. Indexing too much and/or in the wrong places can actually hurt the performance, which is counter-productive.

To access the execution plan:

On the Query menu, click Show Execution Plan, and then run the query in the query window. Execution plans and query results now appear in separate panes of the window so you can view them together.

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Running the execution plan for this query will only tell you where indexing will help this query and not other queries, and it won't speak to other things like insertion cost. –  Robert Harvey Aug 8 '12 at 5:40
    
@RobertHarvey - Correct. Based off of the question title and the OP stating that he created an index on everything, my focus was on indexing. –  RobB Aug 8 '12 at 5:41
    
I've done the execution plan but I have no idea what it means. I get addr, opcode, p1, p2, p3, p4, p5, comment columns and 134 rows but can not make any sense of it –  davidelias16 Aug 8 '12 at 6:36

Well you have range scans on almost all of the fields in the table.

I would suggest looking at the explain, then seeing if the following makes it better:

create index lookup_idx on leads(user_id, timestamp, geo_lat).

If you are using MySQL, you won't be able to use the geo_lat part of that index so use (user_id, timestamp). Oracle can do SKIP SCANS over the ranges so keep geo_lat in the index if using Oracle.

Let us know exactly which database you are using and post both the EXPLAIN PLAN (however you acquire it for that RDBMS) and the CREATE TABLE for leads so that we can see what is going on.

edit noticed this is SQLlite. Probably (user_id, timestamp) in that case, but I can check with SQLfiddle later.

Again, please post the CREATE TABLE and some sample data.

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Generally speaking, you are only going to need indexes (maybe) on those fields that are involved in searching, ordering, joining or WHERE conditions. There are several fields in your table that don't fall into any of those categories; the indexes for those fields can be safely eliminated without negatively impacting your query's performance.

Running an execution plan will tell you if any of the indexes for fields that do fall into one of those categories are also unnecessary. This is possible if, for example, the cardinality of the field is so small (i.e. there are very few unique values) that an index would not help.

More info about SQLite's specific optimization and index usage can be found here: http://www.sqlite.org/optoverview.html.

Worth noting: SQLite will use at most one index for each table in a query. See Choosing between multiple indices. The ANALYZE command will help you determine which indices are the most valuable.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried using the BETWEEN for timestamp but it seemed to make it slower. Which other fields can I use between from or which would it be suited to? –  davidelias16 Aug 8 '12 at 6:37

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