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Got the following exception while executing a java class in a command shelll

Exception in thread "main" java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError: groovy/lang/GroovyObj
ect
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass1(Native Method)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClassCond(ClassLoader.java:631)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.defineClass(ClassLoader.java:615)
        at java.security.SecureClassLoader.defineClass(SecureClassLoader.java:14
1)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.defineClass(URLClassLoader.java:283)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.access$000(URLClassLoader.java:58)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader$1.run(URLClassLoader.java:197)
        at java.security.AccessController.doPrivileged(Native Method)
        at java.net.URLClassLoader.findClass(URLClassLoader.java:190)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:306)
        at sun.misc.Launcher$AppClassLoader.loadClass(Launcher.java:301)
        at java.lang.ClassLoader.loadClass(ClassLoader.java:247)

Because the code is not written by me, and I am not familiar with groovy, it's difficult to me to investigate where the issue is. Please kindly give me a clue.

PS:I have added groovy-all.jar to my classpath.

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java.lang.NoClassDefFoundError means that the Class definition was present during compile time, but is not available in your runtime. can you check the run classpath to make the sure that the appropriate jar is included. –  Ajay George Aug 8 '12 at 6:07
    
Please show how you're invoking the class and where did you place groovy-all.jar. –  Strelok Aug 8 '12 at 6:32
    
@Strelok For example: java -classpath D:\test\groovy-all.jar com.mypackage.Test, As I mentioned the class is not written by me,and it's quite complicated. It's not easy to give the invoking point. –  Tom Aug 8 '12 at 7:22
2  
the reason I asked, is because placing groovy-all.jar on the class path should be enough. If it's not working then the devil in this case is in the detail. So everything is important. How exactly you're invoking the class. Your exact classpath, etc. –  Strelok Aug 8 '12 at 7:39
    
which version of groovy are u using? –  Byter Aug 8 '12 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

An issue I ran into was a version mismatch of Groovy. More specifically, it seemed that I was running a compiled groovy class under 2.1.1 where it was compiled under 1.8.6

Changing the library included on the classpath to 1.8.6 resolved my issue.

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