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I use this pattern repeatedly:

pb= ProgressBar.new("blah_map", wtf.count)
newresult= cache("blah_map") do 
  result.map{ |r| pb.inc; { blah: r[:x] } }
end
pb.finish

or

pb= ProgressBar.new("blah_group", wtf.count)
newresult= cache("blah_group") do 
  result.group_by{ |r| pb.inc; "#{r[:x]}&#{r[:y]}" }
end
pb.finish

So naturally I would like to be able to do

def progress_cache(name, count, &block)
  pb= ProgressBar.new(name, count)
  inject_pb_inc(block) # how??
  # do some caching with yield if cache doesn't exist, don't mind this
  pb.finish
end

And use it as such:

newresult= progress_cache("lol", result.count) do 
  result.map do |r| 
    # progress_cache magically inserted a pb.inc here for pretty animation!  
    r[:omg] 
  end 
end

The question is, how to inject the pb.inc call into the block (map, group_by etc) inside progress_cache block?

Edit: rephrased the question

share|improve this question
    
you need to read github.com/bbatsov/ruby-style-guide –  megas Aug 8 '12 at 6:40
    
@megas because I used four spaces? –  nurettin Aug 8 '12 at 6:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are a few ways to accomplish this, with various tradeoffs in terms of expressiveness:

  1. Send the progress bar as a block param

    def progress_cache(name, count &block)
      pb = ProgressBar.new(name, count)
      result = block.call(pb)
      pb.finish
      result
    end
    

    and use it like

    newresult = progress_cache("lol", result.count) do |pb|
      result.map{|r| pb.inc; r[:omg]}
    end
    
  2. Create a new map function that automatically increments the progress bar (you could overwrite result.map directly, or provide result.map_with_progress, but I'll leave that up to you)

    def map_with_progress(container, name, &block)
      pb = ProgressBar.new(name, container.count)
      result = container.map{|obj| block.call(obj)}
      pb.finish
      result
    end
    

    and then use it like

    newresult = map_with_progress(result, "lol") { |r| r[:omg] }
    

    of course, since you're doing both a map and a group_by, you'd have to have two helper methods here, which might start getting messy.

  3. Use a higher-order function

    def function_with_progress(obj, func_name, name, count, &block)
      pb = ProgressBar.new(name, count)
      result = obj.__send__(func_name) do |param|
        pb.inc
        block.call(param)
      end
      pb.finish
      result
    end
    

    and then use it like

    newresult = function_with_progress(result, "map", "lol", result.count) do |r|
      r[:omg]
    end
    

    but I wouldn't recommend this approach as it's too abstract. It would work in a functional language like javascript or clojure, but I don't think it's appropriate for ruby.

share|improve this answer
    
of course, since you're doing both a map and a group_by, you'd have to have two helper methods here, which might start getting messy. Exactly, that's why I wanted to inject into any block not just map and group_by –  nurettin Aug 8 '12 at 7:03
    
Inserting pb as a block call parameter is a good start, thanks I'll accept this until I see a better answer. –  nurettin Aug 8 '12 at 7:05
    
Okay, I added another example (that probably has some syntax errors) that shows how to do it by passing around method names. You could also pass around lambdas, but since a function isn't a 1st-order primitive in ruby, it quickly gets messy. –  Ben Taitelbaum Aug 8 '12 at 7:11
    
for this usage block.call is not idiomatic, use yield. –  tokland Aug 8 '12 at 7:31
    
@tokland I agree, and according to stackoverflow.com/questions/1410160/ruby-proccall-vs-yield yield is faster. Still, having an implicit block can be confusing, so for illustrative examples, I sometimes prefer to be explicit about which proc is being called. –  Ben Taitelbaum Aug 8 '12 at 8:31

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