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After many attempts to create one-liners that will invert key-value pairs, and reverse an OrderedDict, I have this:

    from collections import OrderedDict as OD

    attributes=OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')))
    print(attributes)

    reversed_attributes=OD(reversed(list(attributes.items())))
    print(reversed_attributes)

    inverted_attributes=OD([reversed(item) for item in attributes.items()])
    print(inverted_attributes)

    ''' Prints 
        OrderedDict([('brand', 'asus'), ('os', 'linux'), ('processor', 'i5'), ('memory', '4G')])
        OrderedDict([('memory', '4G'), ('processor', 'i5'), ('os', 'linux'), ('brand', 'asus')])
        OrderedDict([('asus', 'brand'), ('linux', 'os'), ('i5', 'processor'), ('4G', 'memory')])
    '''

This works, but is it inefficient? By using reversed(list(a.items())) is this creating a lot of overhead, and so is not pythonic? Same for the inverted_attributes.

The point was to avoid for loops and so on, but will this decrease performance as we scale up?

share|improve this question
    
reversed(list(a.items())) creates a lot of overhead because you're unnecessarily creating a list, then iterating it in reverse. Removing the list constructor would iterate the items in reverse directly (no intermediate copying). Similarly, when initializing the new OrderedDict, you want to use a generator expression (w/o [] around it), not a list comprehension, to avoid creating pointless intermediate lists. – ShadowRanger Oct 19 '15 at 13:48
up vote 3 down vote accepted

interesting I also came up with other ways.

>>> from collections import OrderedDict as OD
>>> attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')))

if you want to reverse you can do this

>>> reverse = OD(attributes.items()[::-1])

or a more pythonic approach:

>>> reverse = OD(reversed(attributes.items()))

note you don't need to create list items is already a list, and while reversed is a generator OrderedDict will simply iterate through to it generate the new dict.

both generating similar timings.

$ python -m timeit "from collections import OrderedDict as OD; attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')))" "reverse = OD(attributes.items()[::-1])"
10000 loops, best of 3: 54.8 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit "from collections import OrderedDict as OD; attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')))" "reverse = OD(reversed(attributes.items()))"
10000 loops, best of 3: 54.4 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit "from collections import OrderedDict as OD; attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')))" "reversed_attributes=OD(reversed(list(attributes.items())))"
10000 loops, best of 3: 54.4 usec per loop

if you want to invert:

>>> invert = OD(zip(*zip(*attributes.items())[::-1]))

or more pythonic:

>>> invert = OD(map(reversed, attributes.items()))

again both generating similar timings.

$ python -m timeit "from collections import OrderedDict as OD; attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')));" "invert = OD(zip(*zip(*attributes.items())[::-1]))"
10000 loops, best of 3: 57 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit "from collections import OrderedDict as OD; attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')));" "invert = OD(map(reversed, attributes.items()))"
10000 loops, best of 3: 56.8 usec per loop
$ python -m timeit "from collections import OrderedDict as OD; attributes = OD((('brand','asus'), ('os','linux'), ('processor','i5'), ('memory','4G')));" "inverted_attributes=OD([reversed(item) for item in attributes.items()])"
10000 loops, best of 3: 55.8 usec per loop

you can use the two methods in conjunction to both reverse and invert.

This works, but is it inefficient? By using reversed(list(a.items())) is this creating a lot of overhead, and so is not pythonic? Same for the inverted_attributes.

something can generate a lot of overhead and be pythonic on the other hand something can very very efficient and not be very pythonic, the term has being a bit abused, but thats just my opinion

exert from wikipedia:

A common neologism in the Python community is pythonic, which can have a wide range of meanings related to program style. To say that code is pythonic is to say that it uses Python idioms well, that it is natural or shows fluency in the language. Likewise, to say of an interface or language feature that it is pythonic is to say that it works well with Python idioms, that its use meshes well with the rest of the language.

In contrast, a mark of unpythonic code is that it attempts to write C++ (or Lisp, Perl, or Java) code in Python—that is, provides a rough transcription rather than an idiomatic translation of forms from another language. The concept of pythonicity is tightly bound to Python's minimalist philosophy of readability and avoiding the "there's more than one way to do it" approach. Unreadable code or incomprehensible idioms are unpythonic.

as for:

but will this decrease performance as we scale up?

This hard to say, without knowing why you are making such transforms, or whether or not their an integral part of your system, fundamentally at a bare minimun they are adding linear time/space overhead which may or may not be good, if the number of entries remains small, then no problem but if at every request, assuming this happening at a web server, your are doing this on a large dicts, this can be quite harsh, and may require a redesign to avoid this.

share|improve this answer
1  
samy.vilar, thank you much for a great response--learned much, and have much to learn about zip, map, and timeit. I am a beginning programmer, so perhaps should not worry about what is and is not 'pythonic' at this time. – J_B_M Aug 8 '12 at 8:11
    
@user1583728 no problem, I hope you keep learning and enjoying python :) – Samy Vilar Aug 8 '12 at 8:17
    
@SamyVilar: The question is tagged Python 3.x; your timing tests appear to be running on Python 2.x, which makes a huge difference in behavior (e.g. map/zip/dict.items etc. produce intermediate lists, rather than generators and views. All of the timings will be suspect on that basis alone. – ShadowRanger Oct 19 '15 at 13:50

In Python 3.x, the best way to do this will be to avoid unnecessary intermediate lists. You came close in all your solutions, but you always used a list comprehension or list() constructor unnecessarily. The most Pythonic way to both reverse and invert in Python 3.x will be:

 reversed_and_inverted = OD((v, k) for k, v in reversed(attributes.items()))

while this is slightly less Pythonic, but even faster (asymptotically):

 reversed_and_inverted = OD(map(reversed, reversed(attributes.items())))

This uses a generator expression to initialize the new OrderedDict from the old one, with no intermediate copies (the creation of the reversed tuple of v and k doesn't matter; CPython optimizes uses of fixed length tuples like this to avoid malloc/free overhead).

Similarly, for doing only one or the other:

# Remove list() wrapper to save copy
reversed_attributes=OD(reversed(attributes.items()))

# Remove list comprehension brackets to generate into the OrderedDict directly
# Explicitly unpack and reverse key and value (repeated calls to reversed
# built-in invoke expensive LEGB and function call machinery)
inverted_attributes=OD((v, k) for k, v in attributes.items())

# Or faster, but slightly less Pythonic in some people's opinions
inverted_attributes=OD(map(reversed, attributes.items()))

Some timings as of 3.5, where the built-in OrderedDict runs fast enough that the percentage differences between approaches actually matter somewhat. I'm using ipython's %timeit magic to simplify:

# Make a dict large enough that the differences might actually matter

>>> od1 = OrderedDict(enumerate(string.ascii_uppercase))
>>> %timeit -r5 OrderedDict(reversed(od1.items()))
100000 loops, best of 5: 7.29 μs per loop

# Unnecessary list-ification of items view adds ~15% to run time
>>> %timeit -r5 OrderedDict(reversed(list(od1.items())))
100000 loops, best of 5: 8.35 μs per loop

>>> %timeit -r5 OrderedDict((v, k) for k, v in od1.items())
100000 loops, best of 5: 10 μs per loop

# Surprisingly, runs a little faster as a list comprehension; likely a
# coincidence of construction of OrderedDict from an input of known length
# being optimized to presize the output dict (while lists are optimized for
# reading from unknown length input iterable)
>>> %timeit -r5 OrderedDict([(v, k) for k, v in od1.items()])
100000 loops, best of 5: 9.34 μs per loop

# map produces a generator that knows how long it is if the input also knows
# how long it is, so we can beat either one in this case by avoiding repeated
# lookups of reversed and execution of Python level byte code via:
>>> %timeit -r5 OrderedDict(map(reversed, od1.items()))
100000 loops, best of 5: 8.86 μs per loop
share|improve this answer
    
Note: Because the example inputs are small, timings aren't going to tell you very much. Particularly prior to Python 3.5, OrderedDict is not a built-in (it's implemented as a Python defined class), and the overhead to iterate it and construct it is going to swamp most other costs. – ShadowRanger Oct 19 '15 at 14:00

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