Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

My html page content is below

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 1
    </div>
    <div style="display:none">
        Details 1
    </div>
    <button>Read More</button>
</div>

Details content is collapsed initially. When user clicks the Read More button, I need to show details content. I can make it possible. i will define id for details div tag and javascript for onclick event of button. Using id i will change the div style display.

But i have multiple list of sections based on the back end data. so my page would be renderd like below

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 1
    </div>
    <div style="display:none">
        Details 1
    </div>
    <button>Read More</button>
</div>

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 2
    </div>
    <div style="display:none">
        Details 2
    </div>
    <button>Read More</button>
</div>

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 3
    </div>
    <div style="display:none">
        Details 3
    </div>
    <button>Read More</button>
</div>

Now How can i acheive the expand and collapse functionality when Read More button is clicked.

share|improve this question
2  
Are you using jQuery or pure javascript? –  Armel Larcier Aug 8 '12 at 7:14
    
No i am not using jQuery –  Manikandan Aug 8 '12 at 8:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Using plain javascript and with the strategic addition of some classes, you could do this which would make each button into a toggle that even changes it's text according to the toggle state. Then one piece of javascript would serve for all the repeated instances of this structure and the code would be independent of the exact HTML layout of the summary, details and button (as long as they retained the same classes and were in the same container div.

HTML:

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 1
    </div>
    <div class="details" style="display:none">
        Details 1
    </div>
    <button class="readMore">Read More</button>
</div>

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 2
    </div>
    <div class="details" style="display:none">
        Details 2
    </div>
    <button class="readMore">Read More</button>
</div>

<div>
    <div>
        Summary 3
    </div>
    <div class="details" style="display:none">
        Details 3
    </div>
    <button class="readMore">Read More</button>
</div>​

And the javascript:

function toggleVis(el) {
    var vis = el.style.display != "none";
    if (vis) {
        el.style.display = "none";
    } else {
        el.style.display = "block";
    }
    return(!vis);
}

(function() {
    var readMore = document.getElementsByClassName("readMore");
    for (var i = 0; i < readMore.length; i++) {
        readMore[i].onclick = function(e) {
            var vis = toggleVis(e.target.parentNode.getElementsByClassName("details")[0]);
            e.target.innerHTML = vis ? "Read Less" : "Read More";
        }
    }
})();            

Working Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/aMBkJ/

Note: This would require a shim for getElementsByClassName() on older versions of IE. ​

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for the only non-jQuery solution in a non-jQuery question. Presumably using .getElementsByTagName() would let you achieve pretty much the same thing without needing to alter the html markup, though obviously that would tie the JS code much more closely to the specific html structure. –  nnnnnn Aug 8 '12 at 7:31
    
@nnnnnn - yeah, I don't like to write javascript that is brittle to minor changes in the HTML. I think the OP wanted to avoid IDs because they have a repeated structure, but classes should be just the right tool (at least that's what I would recommend). –  jfriend00 Aug 8 '12 at 7:33
    
@nnnnnn: Why did you downvoted? I am just suggesting OP the jQuery solution instead of forcing him to use it. –  A.K Aug 8 '12 at 7:38

By using jQuery .prev() you may achieve it easily.

$('button').on('click', function(e){
   $(this).prev('div').toggle();
});

DEMO

share|improve this answer
    
@nnnnnn: Why did you downvoted? I am just suggesting OP the jQuery solution instead of forcing him to use it. –  A.K Aug 8 '12 at 7:35
    
The general convention on SO is that you don't offer a jQuery answer unless the OP mentions jQuery, tags as jQuery, the question is already showing jQuery or you ask and the OP says they're interested in jQuery. jQuery people tend to forget that it isn't used in every project. –  jfriend00 Aug 8 '12 at 7:38
    
I've never downvoted on any question or answer. Why do you think I was the "culprit" here? I love jQuery, but I wouldn't suggest including an entire library just to implement one function that can be done pretty easily without it. –  nnnnnn Aug 8 '12 at 7:39
    
@jfriend00: yeah fine, but suggesting someone about another option that is much easier, is not a mistake. –  A.K Aug 8 '12 at 7:41
    
The problem is that we have a question that has ZERO indication that the OP wants a jQuery solution and we get four proposed answers made out of jQuery. What if we also had a bunch of answers proposing YUI and Prototype.js and MooTools and Dojo solutions? It would be a mess. IMO, answers should stick to plain javascript unless a library was indicated by the OP. In this particular case, the question was asked about jQuery and the OP has been AWOL (not answered the call for a clarification). –  jfriend00 Aug 8 '12 at 7:45

You can try this with jquery

<button class="readmore">Read More</button>

jQuery

$('.readmore').click(function(){
   $(this).prev().show();
});
share|improve this answer

Here it is how you do it using jquery:

The HTML code:

<div class="stuff">
<dl id="faq">
    <dt>What shouldn't I do to the bird?</dt>
    <dd>Never try to treat a fracture at home.</dd>
</div>

The JQuery code:

jQuery(document).ready(function() {
$('#faq').find('dd').hide().end().find('dt').click(function(){
       $(this).next().slideToggle();
   });
});
share|improve this answer
1  
OP didn't mention jQuery, and also explicitly asked for a solution that didn't use ids, but even ignoring those issues why did you invent a completely different html structure to demonstrate with? –  nnnnnn Aug 8 '12 at 7:27

Using jQuery:

$('button').on('click', function(e){
   $(this).closest('div').find('div').eq(1).show();
});

.closest() goes up the DOM tree until it finds a match. Then we go back down the DOM tree, finding all the child <divs>. Assuming this structure you show is always the same, we select the second div found and show it.

share|improve this answer
1  
.find('div')[1] returns the actual DOM element, which doesn't have a .show() method. Did you mean .find('div').eq(1)? –  nnnnnn Aug 8 '12 at 7:34
    
@nnnnnn Probably. I'll adjust the sample code. –  Tieson T. Aug 8 '12 at 16:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.