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As stated at mongodb website, i can expire records with .ensureIndex({state:1},{expireAfterSeconds: 10}). But how this could be implemented from rails? Thanks

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Did you try anything? –  Sergio Tulentsev Aug 8 '12 at 7:46
    
Please note: TTL is 2.2 only, of course we dunno what Mongo version you are using but still...Also most drivers have not been update to the 2.2 API, I am unsure how Rubys functions are implemented, also what do you mean by: But how this could be implemented from rails? ? –  Sammaye Aug 8 '12 at 8:14
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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Provided you are using MongoDB 2.2, the Ruby driver should already support this via the Collection's create_index() and ensure_index() methods. Index options are passed directly to the server. The underscored symbols in the API docs are translated internally as a convenience (e.g. :drop_dups sets the :dropDups option). You should be able to do:

@collection.create_index([['state', Mongo::ASCENDING]], :expireAfterSeconds => 10)

For mongoid specifically, it looks like you can pass custom options for indexes as well, per this documentation.

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actually one can't just pass expireAfterSeconds in options, valid option types are: github.com/mongoid/mongoid/blob/master/lib/mongoid/indexes/… –  Vadim Chumel Aug 13 '12 at 14:11
    
I assume mongoid would want to stick to the underscored pseudonyms defined by the driver. Rather than wait for expire_after_seconds to appear, perhaps you can access the raw collection class from mongoid and run the command yourself? –  jmikola Aug 13 '12 at 14:15
    
yes, this is exactly what i have done, thanks for suggestion –  Vadim Chumel Aug 22 '12 at 15:12
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