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So far I've been sending attachments with SOAP using simple base64 enciding and placing them inline - all done by CURL. Now I have a new request, where attachments need to be sent as MTOM attachments, the question is: is it possible with linux curl?

I can see that it is possible using JAX-WS, but in order to do this we would have to develope new client which isn't actually the best option for us.

Please, tell me if it is possible, and if yes, give me any hints how to do it.

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1 Answer

You can include the file content in base64 encoding and using curl post.

Here is one example:

  1. Have mtom sample from axis2 installed and working for you
  2. Construct the following sample req.xml

$ cat req.xml

<soap:Envelope xmlns:soap="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope" xmlns:mtom="http://ws.apache.org/axis2/mtomsample/" xmlns:xm="http://www.w3.org/2005/05/xmlmime">
   <soap:Header/>
   <soap:Body>
      <mtom:AttachmentRequest>
         <mtom:fileName>one.txt</mtom:fileName>
         <mtom:binaryData xm:contentType="application/txt">SSBhbSB0aGUgZ3JlYXRlc3Qu</mtom:binaryData>
  </mtom:AttachmentRequest>
   </soap:Body>
</soap:Envelope>
  1. post the request using curl

$ cat req.xml | curl -X POST -H 'Content-type: application/soap+xml' -d @-
http://yourmachine.com:8080/axis2/services/MTOMSample.MTOMSampleSOAP12port_http/

<?xml version='1.0' encoding='UTF-8'?>
<soapenv:Envelope xmlns:soapenv="http://www.w3.org/2003/05/soap-envelope">
  <soapenv:Body>
    <ns2:AttachmentResponse xmlns:ns2="http://ws.apache.org/axis2/mtomsample/">
      File saved succesfully.
    </ns2:AttachmentResponse>
  </soapenv:Body>
</soapenv:Envelope>

Does this work for you?

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