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I have one asynchronous method:

public async Task<BitmapSource> GetBitmapAsync(double[] pixels);

Let's say I also have this class:

public class PixelData
{
    public double[] Pixels { get; }
}

I now want to create a convenience method producing a BitmapSource output, using the asynchronous method above to do the work. I can come up with at least three approaches to do this, but it is not immediately obvious to me which one I should choose from an efficiency and reliability point of view.

Can someone advice; what are the advantages and drawbacks of each one of the following approaches?

Option A Create a synchronous method that returns the Result of the Task:

public BitmapSource GetBitmap(PixelData pixelData)
{
    return GetBitmapAsync(pixelData.Pixels).Result;
}

Option B Create a synchronous (or is it asynchronous?) method that returns Task<BitmapSource>:

public Task<BitmapSource> GetBitmap(PixelData pixelData)
{
    return GetBitmapAsync(pixelData.Pixels);
}

Option C Create an asynchronous method that explicitly uses await:

public async Task<BitmapSource> GetBitmapAsync(PixelData pixelData)
{
    return await GetBitmapAsync(pixelData.Pixels);
}
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And you want to be able to call this convenience method asynchronously also? If so, from what I can see on the face of it the first two options won't achieve this, only the third will. –  Adam Houldsworth Aug 8 '12 at 8:12
    
Not necessarily (do I want to call the convenience method asynchronously), but if that is the most reliable/correct way to do it, then yes. –  Anders Gustafsson Aug 8 '12 at 8:13
    
@AdamHouldsworth Sorry for my ignorance in this matter, but will Option B be handled as a synchronous method for certain? The fact that it returns a Task<BitmapSource>, is that irrelevant with respect to (a)synchronicity? –  Anders Gustafsson Aug 8 '12 at 8:22
1  
@AndersGustafsson, It will not run synchronously. –  Filip Ekberg Aug 8 '12 at 8:27
1  
Methods are not awaitable. Only types are awaitable, so you can await a Task regardless of whether it's returned from an async or non-async method. –  Stephen Cleary Aug 8 '12 at 11:01

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you're over-thinking this.

You've got a method that returns a type that happens to be a Task<T>. You want a method that takes a different type of parameter and passes through to the original method. So Option B is fine:

public Task<BitmapSource> GetBitmap(PixelData pixelData)
{
    return GetBitmapAsync(pixelData.Pixels);
}

The method should be called GetBitmapAsync though.

Option A would be the way to expose a synchronous ( blocking ) version of the method.

Option C doesn't actually achieve anything more than Option B.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, Nicholas! Is it even so that Option C is worse than Option B, in that it would add redundant asynchronous handling? Or are the two options equivalent internally? –  Anders Gustafsson Aug 8 '12 at 8:46
1  
You're welcome and yes - Option C just adds overhead. –  Nicholas Butler Aug 8 '12 at 8:49
2  
Also, Option A can cause deadlocks. Stephen Toub has a good video on async performance, and he points out that Option C is not a good idea (for overhead reasons). –  Stephen Cleary Aug 8 '12 at 10:59

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