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Making a flat list out of list of lists in Python

I am trying to find an easy way to to turn a multi dimensional (nested) python list into a single list, that contains all the elements of the sublists.

For example:

A = [[1,2,3,4,5]]

turns to

A = [1,2,3,4,5]

or

A = [[1,2], [3,4]]

turns to

A = [1,2,3,4]
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marked as duplicate by Chris, jamylak, moooeeeep, sloth, Joel Cornett Aug 8 '12 at 9:05

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
[item for sublist in l for item in sublist]. This is a duplicate of a number of other questions. See, for example, stackoverflow.com/q/952914/623518, stackoverflow.com/q/406121/623518 and stackoverflow.com/q/457215/623518. –  Chris Aug 8 '12 at 8:25
    
@zrxq It isn't that question but it is a duplicate of the ones mentioned by Chris –  jamylak Aug 8 '12 at 8:27

4 Answers 4

Use itertools.chain:

itertools.chain(*iterables):

Make an iterator that returns elements from the first iterable until it is exhausted, then proceeds to the next iterable, until all of the iterables are exhausted. Used for treating consecutive sequences as a single sequence.

Example:

from itertools import chain

A = [[1,2], [3,4]]

print list(chain(*A))
# or better: (available since Python 2.6)
print list(chain.from_iterable(A))

The output is:

[1, 2, 3, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4]
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Use reduce function

reduce(lambda x, y: x + y, A, [])

Or sum

sum(A, [])
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reduce() is considered unpythonic. –  Joel Cornett Aug 8 '12 at 9:04

itertools provides the chain function for that:

From http://docs.python.org/library/itertools.html#recipes:

def flatten(listOfLists):
    "Flatten one level of nesting"
    return chain.from_iterable(listOfLists)

Note that the result is an iterable, so you may need list(flatten(...)).

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the first case can also be easily done as:

A=A[0]
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