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For example, suppose there is the code in Rails 3.2.3

def test_action
  a = User.find_by_id(params[:user_id])
  # some calculations.....
  b = Reporst.find_by_name(params[:report_name])
  # some calculations.....
  c = Places.find_by_name(params[:place_name])
end

This code does 3 requests to database and opens 3 different connections. Most likely it's going to be a quite long action.

Is there any way to open only one connection and do 3 requests within it? Or I want to control which connection to use by myself.

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Why do you think the code opens 3 different connections? Are they in different databases? –  xdazz Aug 8 '12 at 9:02
    
I just think so. –  Alexandre Aug 8 '12 at 9:08

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You would want to bracket the calls with transaction:

Transactions are protective blocks where SQL statements are only permanent if they can all succeed as one atomic action. The classic example is a transfer between two accounts where you can only have a deposit if the withdrawal succeeded and vice versa. Transactions enforce the integrity of the database and guard the data against program errors or database break-downs. So basically you should use transaction blocks whenever you have a number of statements that must be executed together or not at all.

def test_action
  User.transaction do
    a = User.find_by_id(params[:user_id])
    # some calculations.....
    b = Reporst.find_by_name(params[:report_name])
    # some calculations.....
    c = Places.find_by_name(params[:place_name])
  end
end

Even though they invoke different models the actions are encapsulated into one call to the DB. It is all or nothing though. If one fails in the middle then the entire capsule fails.

Though the transaction class method is called on some Active Record class, the objects within the transaction block need not all be instances of that class. This is because transactions are per-database connection, not per-model.

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You can take a look at ActiveRecord::ConnectionAdapters::ConnectionPool documentation Also AR doesn't open a connection for each model/query it reuses the existent connection.

[7] pry(main)> [Advertiser.connection,Agent.connection,ActiveRecord::Base.connection].map(&:object_id)
=> [70224441876100, 70224441876100, 70224441876100]
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