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I'm trying with no chance to transform sql attributes to java format. Let's have an example: I want to change: "p_start_date" to "pStartSate".

I've tried to use

String var = "p_start_date";
var.replaceAll("(_[a-z])\1", "([A-Z])\1");

and also

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("([a-z0-9]+_)*");
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(var);


    if (matcher.find()) {
        // Get all groups for this match
        //System.out.println(matcher.groupCount());
        for (int i=0; i<=matcher.groupCount(); i++) {
            String groupStr = matcher.group(i);
            System.out.println(groupStr);
        }
    }

But both doesn't work

share|improve this question
    
why do you need it ? if you want to make java objects out of tables you could use an ORM framework. –  Simeon Aug 8 '12 at 9:05
    
I'm using named queries in my JEE project and it returns a DTO. That's why I'm using this conventionality –  bouhmid_tun Aug 8 '12 at 9:09
    
@Simeon do you have any proposal? –  bouhmid_tun Aug 8 '12 at 9:24

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is this what you are looking for?

String var = "p_start_date";

Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("_([a-z])");
Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(var);

StringBuffer sb=new StringBuffer();
while(matcher.find()) {
    matcher.appendReplacement(sb, matcher.group(1).toUpperCase());
}
matcher.appendTail(sb);

System.out.println(sb);

output: pStartDate

share|improve this answer
    
Please don't use a StringBuffer when you can use a StringBuilder. –  Peter Lawrey Aug 13 '12 at 8:03

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