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I am working on SQL Server 2008, and wanted to know about what is the differnce between Cartesian Product and Cross Join. Can somebody please help me to clear the concept?

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You mean cartesian product? It is the same as cross join. – sventevit Aug 8 '12 at 9:24
up vote 13 down vote accepted

When you do Cross join you will get cartesian product. Each row in the first table is matched with every row in the second table

enter image description here

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I got it, CROSS JOIN = Cartesian product. Hope we achieve the same using, select * from table1, table2; – Aki Jan 2 '15 at 10:55

Have a look at the following article

SQL SERVER – Introduction to JOINs – Basic of JOINs

Specifically at the section CROSS JOIN

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Wikipedia got more than enough details on this (with examples)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Join_%28SQL%29

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Both the joins give same result.Cross join is SQL 99 join and Cartesian product is Oracle Propreitary join.

A cross join that does not have a 'where' clause gives the casterian product. Casterian product resultset contains no of rows in first table multiplied by no of rows in second table.

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CROSS JOIN

This join is a Cartesian join that does not necessitate any condition to join. The resultset contains records that are multiplication of record number from both the tables.

cross join

/* CROSS JOIN */
SELECT t1.*,t2.*
FROM Table1 t1
CROSS JOIN Table2 t2

Sorce:
APRIL 13, 2009 BY PINAL DAVE
SQL SERVER – Introduction to JOINs – Basic of JOINs

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