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I have a field which has strings (commas part of string) like "X1,X2,X3,X4,X5". Let's take example MySQL table-

id FIELD1
1 X1,X3
2 X1,X3,X4
3 X2,X3,X4
4 X2,X4
5 X1,X3,X4,X5,X6

let Q = "X1,X3,X4,X5"

Now, what is the query to get rows where all the characters of FIELD1 value are contained in Q. Q is such that there are only 8 characters(X1,X2..) of such kind, and characters in a string are not repeated.

Select id FIELD WHERE "...Some regex on characters of Q...." 

In other words, it should return, row 1, 2 as X1, X3, X4 present in Q. It should not return row 3,4,5 as X2,X6 is not present in Q.

Thank you so much

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Your database structure is violationg the first normalisation rule. You better redesign your DB. –  juergen d Aug 8 '12 at 9:47
    
the database is already there, so I can't change it now... :( could you please tell me how do I get the results? –  Demo User Aug 8 '12 at 9:56
    
I completely agree with @juergend, you should use the database properly, not search for half-baked solutions. –  N.B. Aug 8 '12 at 9:58
    
Probably, you mean to say it's violating rule "All columns should contain a single value". If I do it like that, the number of columns can grow exponentially,as there are many such "Fields"..That's why it's designed like that. –  Demo User Aug 8 '12 at 10:07
    
If you do it like that you'll have to create another many-to-many table to store the links, not adding new columns for each "Fields". –  Olivier Coilland Aug 8 '12 at 10:30
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As juergen d said before me, your DB structure is faulty.

If you are using this structure, the ugly SQL query you'll get is the following:

SELECT id FROM Crooked_Table WHERE (FIELD1 LIKE '%X1%' OR FIELD1 LIKE '%X3%' OR FIELD1 LIKE '%X4%' OR FIELD1 LIKE '%X5%') AND NOT (FIELD1 LIKE '%X2%' OR FIELD1 LIKE '%X6%')

And you'll need to cover all possible comma-separated values in the query, otherwise it won't work.

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Thanks, Uri. It's working. –  Demo User Aug 8 '12 at 16:26
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