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I have two images among many that I want to swap places between. If I click on one image, then the other, the respective images should swap with each other and the rest should remain the same. I'm a beginner at this so any help or direction would be helpful.

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3  
Have you tried anything? –  Richard Dalton Aug 8 '12 at 10:05
2  
How does your html-markup look like? You provide way to few information to get a proper answer. –  Christoph Aug 8 '12 at 10:15

6 Answers 6

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is a different approach that swaps the actual elements rather than the src of the img, also avoids using external variables for the swap.

$('img.swap').on('click', function() {
    var t = $(this);
    if (t.hasClass('clicked')) {
        t.removeClass('clicked');
        return;
    }

    var clicked = $('img.swap.clicked')
    if (clicked.length === 0) {
        t.addClass('clicked');        
        return;
    }
    var placeHolder = $('<div id="placeholder"></div>');
    clicked.before(placeHolder);
    t.after(clicked);
    placeHolder.before(t).remove();
    clicked.removeClass('clicked');
});​

Example - http://jsfiddle.net/BxST9/3/ (using div instead of img but shouldn't make a difference)

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This works also for every image:

 <img src="http://stunningwebsitetemplates.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/jquery.png"/>
 <img src="http://bloggerschmidt.de/images/stories/logo-mootools.gif" />
 <img src="http://stunningwebsitetemplates.files.wordpress.com/2011/12/jquery.png"/>
 <img src="http://bloggerschmidt.de/images/stories/logo-mootools.gif" />

JS

 $(function(){
     var src="";
     var old;
     $("img").click(function(){
         if(src=="")
         {
            src=$(this).attr("src"); 
             old=$(this);
         }
         else
         {
             old.attr("src",$(this).attr("src"));
             $(this).attr("src",src);
             src="";
         }
      });
 });​
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Another solution without any global variable.

html

<div id="images">
  <img scr="/images/1.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/2.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/3.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/4.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/5.jpg" />&nbsp;
</div>

Js file

$('img').click(function(){
    if($('#images img').hasClass('selected')){
        var src = $(this).attr('src');
        $('.selected').attr('src',src);
        $(this).attr('src',$('.selected').attr('src'));
        $(this).removeClass('selected');
    }
    else
        $(this).addClass('selected');   
});
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See the example on: http://jsfiddle.net/Lvp4j/1/

var selected;
$("img").click(
    function() { 
        if (!selected)
        {
            selected = this; 
            $(selected).addClass("selected");
        }
        else
        {
            var src1 = $(selected).attr("src");
            var src2 = $(this).attr("src");
            $(this).attr("src", src1);
            $(selected).attr("src", src2);
            $(selected).removeClass("selected");
            selected = null;
        }
    }
);

My code adds also a selected class so you can highlight the clicked image...

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try below code

html

<div>
  <img scr="/images/1.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/2.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/3.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/4.jpg" />&nbsp;
  <img scr="/images/5.jpg" />&nbsp;
</div>

Js file

(function() {
    var swapArray = [];
    var count=0;
    $('img').click(function(){
        count++;
        swapArray.push($(this).attr('src'));
        $(this).addClass(count);
        if(count==2){
            $('.1').attr('src',swapArray[1]).removeClass('1');
            $('.2').attr('src',swapArray[0]).removeClass('2');
            swapArray.length = 0;
            count=0;
        }
    });
}());​
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1  
live is deprecated and global vars should be avoided too... –  Christoph Aug 8 '12 at 10:15
    
you can use global variables if you know how to use them. :) –  Jitendra Pancholi Aug 8 '12 at 10:17
1  
It's not a matter of how to use them, it's just bad practice. Just use a closure. –  Christoph Aug 8 '12 at 10:19
    
You can not store data in local variables to use them in future. –  Jitendra Pancholi Aug 8 '12 at 10:20
    
Sure you can. That's the sense of a closure... –  Christoph Aug 8 '12 at 10:23

Given this HTML:

<img src="image_1.jpg" />
<img src="image_2.jpg" />
<img src="image_3.jpg" />
<img src="image_4.jpg" />

You could use the following JavaScript:

(function() {
    var previous = null;

    $('img').click(function() {
        var current = $(this);
        if (current.is(previous)) {    // clicked same image twice; reset
            reset_clicked();
        } else if (previous != null) { // two images clicked; swap
            swap_src(previous, current);
            reset_clicked();
        } else {
            set_clicked(current);
        }
    });

    function reset_clicked() {
        previous.removeClass('clicked');
        previous = null;
    }

    function set_clicked(img) {
        img.addClass('clicked');
        previous = img;
    }

    function swap_src(img1, img2) {
        var src1 = img1.attr('src');
        img1.attr('src', img2.attr('src'));
        img2.attr('src', src1);
    }
}());​

The 'clicked' class is added purely so you can use CSS to style clicked images. This class could also be used to identify any previously-clicked images, but I've used a JavaScript variable instead because that's quicker than a DOM lookup.

There's a demo on JSFiddle: jsfiddle.net/cvthL/2

This answer was posted as an improved version of Jitendra Pancholi's first answer and an alternative to his/her second answer.

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See my 2nd answer which is very much simple than this :) –  Jitendra Pancholi Aug 8 '12 at 11:03
    
@JitendraPancholi I did see it, and it's very nice. I deliberately chose a more complicated approach (including a cancellable first click) to show how your first answer could have been done without global variables. Notice the closure around the code? No global variables. At all. Neat, huh? :) –  PPvG Aug 8 '12 at 11:07
    
you have also taken one global variable "clicked_image". –  Jitendra Pancholi Aug 8 '12 at 11:11
    
@JitendraPancholi No, clicked_image is in the anonymous function's scope (inside the closure); it's not set to window.clicked_image like in your first answer. That was the whole point of posting this answer... –  PPvG Aug 8 '12 at 11:13
    
Yeah, yes, you can put my first solution inside a closure as i updated already :) –  Jitendra Pancholi Aug 8 '12 at 11:16

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