Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've always heard that when you use absolute positioning that the element you want to act as its parent needs to have a position of relative.

I was trying to build a CSS dropdown menu and I was struggling to get the dropdown menu items stretch beyond the width of the main menu item when I had its parent element I wanted it to use set as relative; the text in the drop down menu items would just wrap.

So I looked around at other example menus to see how they did it and one I found wasn't even using any parent elements with a position of relative even though they were using absolute positioning like I was.

That example is here: http://purecssmenu.com/

So I tried removing my relative positioning and bingo - my problem went away. However now I am using absolute positioning with none of it's parents using relative positioning, they are all set to static.

So I'm wondering how that makes sense - with no relative parents wouldn't it fall back to the browser window?

If need be, here is my HTML:

    <div class="navWrapper">
        <div class="left"></div>
        <div class="nav">
            <ul>
                <li class="home"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
                <li class="spacer"></li>
                <li class="about"><a href="about_us/">About Us</a></li>
                <li class="spacer"></li>
                <li class="trademark"><a href="freetrademarksearch/">Free Trademark Search</a></li>
                <li class="spacer"></li>
                <li class="services">
                    <a href="services/">Services</a>
                    <ul class="sub">
                        <li><a href="">Trademark Search</a></li>
                        <li><a href="">Prepare &amp; File Trademark</a></li>
                        <li><a href="">Trademark Infringement</a></li>
                    </ul>
                </li>
                <li class="spacer"></li>
                <li class="testimonials"><a href="testimonials/">Testimonials</a></li>
                <li class="spacer"></li>
                <li class="more"><a href="javascript:void(0);">More Information</a></li>
                <li class="spacer"></li>
                <li class="contact"><a href="contact-us/">Contact Us</a></li>                 
            </ul>
            <div class="contentClear"></div>
        </div>
        <!-- Nav Ends -->
        <div class="right"></div>
    </div>
    <!-- Nav Wrapper Ends -->

CSS:

#header .navWrapper {
    width: 1004px;
}

#header .navWrapper .left {
    float: left;
    width: 4px;
    min-width: 4px;
    height: 47px;
    min-height: 47px;
    background: url('../images/nav-left-bg.png') left top no-repeat;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav {
    float: left;
    width: 994px;
    border-top: 1px solid #e0d0b4;
    border-left: 1px solid #e0d0b4;
    border-right: 1px solid #e0d0b4;
    border-bottom: 1px solid #e8dcc8;
    background: url('../images/nav-button-bg.png') left top repeat-x;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav ul {
    margin: 0 1px;
    display: block;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li {
    float: left;
    display: block;
    height: 45px;
    font-family: OpenSansBold, Arial;
    font-size: 16px;
    line-height: 2.9;
    text-align: center;
    color: #646464;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li.spacer {
    width: 2px;
    min-width: 2px;
    height: 45px;
    min-height: 45px;
    background: url('../images/nav-button-spacer-bg.png') left top no-repeat;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li a,
#header .navWrapper .nav li a:visited
{
    display: block;
    height: 45px;
    padding: 0 20px;
    color: #646464;
    text-decoration: none;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li a:hover,
#header .navWrapper .nav li a:active,
#header .navWrapper .nav li a:focus
{
    color: #fff;
    background: url('../images/nav-button-bg.png') left bottom repeat-x;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li.home {
    max-width: 86px;
    text-indent: -1px;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub {
    position: absolute;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub li {
    float: none;
    display: block;
    font-family: OpenSansSemibold, Arial;
    font-size: 14px;
    line-height: 2.3;
    height: auto;
    text-align: center;
    background-color: #f4771d;
    color: #fff;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub li a,
#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub li a
{
    color: #fff;
    height: auto;
}

#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub li a:hover,
#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub li a:focus,
#header .navWrapper .nav li ul.sub li a:active
{
    background: #d66627;
}

#header .navWrapper .right {
    float: right;
    width: 4px;
    min-width: 4px;
    height: 47px;
    min-height: 47px;    
    background: url('../images/nav-right-bg.png') left top no-repeat;
}
share|improve this question
    
Please see my latest update, which shows how you can see how purecssmenu.com is applying position:relative to the parent <ul> on :hover –  Faust Aug 8 '12 at 11:26
    
Ok I see it, but I think you mean the parent <li>, not <ul>. :) –  Brett Aug 8 '12 at 14:33
1  
I see. This is working for you because, although you have set position:absolute on the list, you have not defined any of the top, left, bottom, or right properties. Those properties do not just default to 0. When neither top nor bottom is specified, the element is vertically positioned where it would otherwise be positioned were it still part of the flow. Same goes for left and right and horizontal positioning. Try setting any one of those properties to 0px, and you'll see what I mean. –  Faust Aug 8 '12 at 15:21
    
...so in your case, setting position:absolute is needed becaues it removes the sub-menu from the flow, allowing the container li, which doesn't have a specified width, to keep the width computed by the text at the top of the menu. Whereas if you had position:relative, on the sub-list, its width would force the containing li to widen, causing the "Contact Us item to drop to the next line. –  Faust Aug 8 '12 at 15:30
    
OK cool, thanks for the explanation. :) –  Brett Aug 8 '12 at 15:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

It falls back to the nearest ancestor element that has position defined as relative, absolute, or fixed -- not just relative, but any value other than static (the default).

Generally, you'd want to position the item absolutely according to a grid established by its parent. However, sometimes it makes sense to have it positioned to a grid established by a higher up element.

For example:

HTML

<body>
    <div id="div1">
        <div id="div2-A">[some content]</div>
        <div id="div2-B">
            <div id="div3">[more content]</div>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

CSS

#div1{
    width:1024px;margin:auto;
    position:relative
}
#div3{
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0px; left:0px;
}

In this case, div3 will be positioned all the way to the left & bottom of div1 -- its grandfather -- because its immediate parent (div2) has the default position:static, and so does not establish as an absolute positioning context/grid for its children. But div3 will not (necessarily) go all the way to the left of the viewport or the page body because the next higher up element (div1) has position defined as relative.

UPDATE
In the case you provided (http://purecssmenu.com/), the position:relative declaration is being applied on the :hover pseudo-class, so you won't see it immediately in the styles listed for Google Developer Tools or Firebug.

You can inspect this in Google developer tools by inspecting the parent element, then in the right-hand side of the "Styles" panel, click the "Toggle Element State" button, (looks like a box with dotted border and an arrow pointing in it), then check the box next to ":hover". I'm sure Firebug has something similar.

You'll see this declaration added to the list:

ul.cssMenu li:hover { position: relative; }

This works because when you're not hovering on the parent <li>, the sub-menu <ul> is hidden with display:none, so it doesn't matter where it's positioned.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but even on that page you can see all the parent elements of the absolute positioned nested UL have static positioning. –  Brett Aug 8 '12 at 10:24
2  
You missed the declaration on its parents hover ul.cssMenu li:hover { position: relative; } –  Faust Aug 8 '12 at 10:37
    
good answer! but why not just set position:relative to the li from the beginning? Why just on hover? –  Niklas Ringdahl Aug 8 '12 at 10:48
    
...see my update. –  Faust Aug 8 '12 at 10:49
    
@Niklas: Actually, there's no reason for that (or maybe it's just to confuse us!). I'm just reporting how the folks at purecssmenu.com did it. –  Faust Aug 8 '12 at 10:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.