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I am trying to learn Python (3) and I wanted to have a go at some OOP. I wrote this program, in which two Computer "players" play "Rock Paper Scissors". It works, but I'd like if someone could have a look and tell me if I have made any silly mistakes!

# rock.py
# example of OOP
import random

class Rock:
    def main(self):
        self.Make_players()
        print("Best of Five - Let's play!\n")
        done  = False
        while done == False:
            self.p1.go_player()
            self.p2.go_player()
            print()
            if self.p2.go == self.p1.go:
                print("No winner!\n")
                continue
            else:
                temp = self.check(self.p1, self.p2)
            if temp == False:
                temp = self.check(self.p2, self.p1)
            print(self.message, end = " ")
            print(temp.name + " won this round.")
            temp.scored()
            print(self.p1.name + ": " + str(self.p1.score))
            print(self.p2.name + ": " + str(self.p2.score))
            if self.p1.score == 3:
                self.winner = self.p1
                done = True
            elif self.p2.score == 3:
                self.winner = self.p2
                done = True
            else:
                done = False
                input()
        print("The winner was " + self.winner.name + "!")


def __init__(self):
    print("**** Welcome to Rock, Paper, Scissors!****\n")
    self.winner = False
    self.main()

def Make_players(self):
    temp = (input("What shall we call Player 1? "))
    self.p1 = Player(temp)
    temp = (input("What shall we call Player 2? "))
    self.p2 = Player(temp)

def check(self, p_a, p_b):
    if p_a.go == "rock" and p_b.go == "scissors":
        self.message = "Rock breaks scissors."
        return p_a
    elif p_a.go == "paper" and p_b.go == "rock":
        self.message = "Paper wraps stone."
        return p_a
    elif p_a.go == "scissors" and p_b.go == "paper":
        self.message = "Scissors cut paper."
        return p_a
    else:
        return False

class Player:
    def __init__(self, name):
        self.choices = ["rock", "paper", "scissors"]
        self.score = 0
        self.name = name
        print("Player:", self.name, "created!\n")

    def go_player(self):
        self.go = random.choice(self.choices)
        print(self.name + " chose " + self.go, end = ". ")
        return self.go

    def scored(self):
        self.score += 1

# Main
game = Rock()
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closed as not constructive by sloth, Dietrich Epp, razlebe, ρяσѕρєя K, Andrew Barber Aug 8 '12 at 20:27

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
This looks more like a candidate for codereview.stackexchange.com, unless you have a question that can be answered as per the FAQ. –  Tim Pietzcker Aug 8 '12 at 10:16
1  
Both the Rock class and the Player class have too many responsibilities. Specifically, you should factor out printing, reading from console, and the game loop. Or at the very least put the Rock main loop in a method called run. It should not start looping from the constructor. –  Deestan Aug 8 '12 at 10:21
    
Okay thanks. Deestan –  antiloquax Aug 8 '12 at 10:22
1  
@Deestan: as this question stays now, I think your comment above deserves to be posted as an answer. –  jsbueno Aug 8 '12 at 12:52
1  
Thanks jsbueno. I am not very experienced in using this site. This is helpful. –  antiloquax Aug 8 '12 at 13:17
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1 Answer

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The benefits of OOP is that you can divide the program into different objects/classes based on roles, responsibilites and concerns. Currently, both the Rock class and the Player class have too many responsibilities.

Specifically, you should factor out printing, reading from console, and the game loop. I would put them in a Game class controller.

Whether you factor it out or not, you should also put the Rock main loop in a method called run. It should not start looping from the constructor.

In the end, your module level code could look like this:

# Main
game = Game()
game.run()
print("Game ended.")
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1  
Thanks again. Very helpful for a beginner! –  antiloquax Aug 8 '12 at 13:16
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