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Imagine you have some class with certain atributes. This class has a private method which calculates something based on the parameters. E.g (Java):

public class Foo {
    private Lorem c1;
    private Ipsun c2;
    //...
    private Justo c12;

    private Double selfExplanatoryMethodName(){
        //This method uses c1, c3 and c4
    }
}

Would it be a better practice to have the header of the method like:
private Double selfExplanatoryMethodName(Lorem c1, Amet c3, Sit c4) {/*...*/}

Imagine that this method is a hashing method, it might be usefull to know what parameters it uses for generating the hash.

So, do you think that this is a good practice or not?, and why?

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closed as not constructive by casperOne Aug 9 '12 at 13:47

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5 Answers

Might depend on the language you use. But with my experience I'd say Yes, it is good practice.

It is much easier/faster to read & understand if the parameters are included. If you would like it to be even worse you could also skip the return value, or even worse only use global variables.

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I think what Nishant´s answer says is true: While what you say is not completely untrue, it really depends. –  TheBlastOne Aug 9 '12 at 7:16
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It depends on what the method does. If the method does something with the object, I think parameters are wrong. If the method does something with the object and needs additional information( e.g. another object) then parameters are mandatory. If the method does nothing with the object you should check if it should be a static method instead.

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I'm speaking entirely as a Java programmer, but if you have a method that accesses the fields of that class, I've never put parameters in the method and passed the fields back in that way. Instead, I'd comment at the top of the method (especially with javadoc) what exactly this method does to the fields. Ripping out fields and passing them around kind of defeats the purpose of encapsulation.

At least for object-oriented programming, it's never made sense to me to pass in something that the class already keeps as fields. By making something a field in a class, we're saying "Hey, I think this is useful information for you, stuff that you might need later". If it never actually uses that information for itself and is always fed the information on the fly, why should it keep it?

Bottom line: if the variable actually belongs as a field and it's not already clear enough what your function does, adding more parameters and passing the class's fields back in isn't the way to make your code clear. If anything, it'll make the code itself more confusing and unnecessarily wordy.

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Luckily, @eversor has a selfExplanatoryMethodName and doesn't need comments. –  Urs Reupke Aug 9 '12 at 6:44
    
Unless the method is something like a getter or setter, I highly doubt that the method actually doesn't need comments. In any case, I stand by what I said; you shouldn't create parameters and rip out fields to pass in. Parameters to a function should only be things that the class itself doesn't keep. –  Dennis Meng Aug 9 '12 at 6:49
    
re: Comments - Even for a public API I strongly believe (and have seen evidence) that clear naming can take you places. Here, we're talking about private methods, so I doubt he'd need any. –  Urs Reupke Aug 9 '12 at 7:04
    
I agree that clear naming is a must, but good comments are an absolute must too. Unless it's a really small piece of code (like a getter or setter), you're going to eventually forget what that function does within the context of your program if there aren't good comments to guide you along. –  Dennis Meng Aug 9 '12 at 7:09
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I disagree with Qiau.

In my experience, relying on fields makes for much cleaner code and enhances readability by reducing clutter.
A class is a white box, and readers can rely on your intuitively chosen field names to deduce what the method does with them. Also, it leaning on fields to higher (visible) cohesion.

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I think what Nishant´s answer says is true: While what you say is not completely untrue, it really depends. –  TheBlastOne Aug 9 '12 at 7:15
    
To me, Nishant's answer reads like "Use fields whenever available", but with so many more words. Since my intention does not appear to be clear, I have amended mine. –  Urs Reupke Aug 9 '12 at 7:40
    
However, what part of my answer "depends"? –  Urs Reupke Aug 9 '12 at 7:41
    
The "whenever available" contains the implicit design decision "Will I make this a field?". You decide to make it a field if the data is state information. You decide to make it NOT a field but a parameter if the information is a parameter for some calculation (or operation). And that is imho what the answer should depend on. I.e. if you ask "should I make this a param or a field", you in reality ask yourself "is this state info, or 'environmental' info?" and should consider make the 'param' a field, or vice versa. Nishant's answer points into this direction. –  TheBlastOne Aug 9 '12 at 12:27
    
Obviously. Sorry, I wasn't at my best this morning. –  Urs Reupke Aug 9 '12 at 16:22
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To parameterize or not to parameterize is the question...

... when it's just a function that takes input and returns an output without any dependency on state of the object: So, you have to have a method that takes parameters and performs some magic and return a value... a true function -- you should use parameters. Your method is a black-box. Java provides static keyword for such methods, and you should use static methods for tasks that solely dependent on parameters. These cases should have parameterized methods. Example:

 public static String encodeString(String input, String format)

... when it's a function that solely processes the state of object and return a value: like a hashcode method. You should never pass the arguments... the method should an instance method... it should use instance fields to do the magic. This is an example:

 public String toString(){
    return this.attr1 +", " + this.attr2; //<-- see I haven't passed attr1, attr2
 }

... when some of the external input is required and some state attributes too: like you have a method that operates on state objects based on external input to return a result. Pass only the externally needed parameters. For example:

 public String toFormat(String format){
    if("json".equals(format)  //<-- this is external agent.
      return new JSONObject(this).toString();
    else
      return this.attr1 +", " + this.attr2; //<-- see I haven't passed attr1, attr2

 }

So, it's dependent on what you are doing.


Edit1: (answering comment)

Coming to Why?

It's about minimizing redundancy. This is why the points mentioned above should be taken as rule of thumb: do not create unnecessary objects; do not bloat the parameter list.

I mentioned what are the good practices in which scenario. You weight your situation and decide what to use. So, if you have a method say,

int add(int a, int b){returns a+b;} 

It's a good practice to pass a and b and have this method as static one. But doing new Additor(a, b).add(); where

public int add(){return this.a + this.b;} 

is not so good idea.

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+1 for hitting the nail. –  TheBlastOne Aug 9 '12 at 7:14
    
Nishant, you completely omit the "why" part of the question. Could you expand your answer by reasoning for your instructions? (Not that I disagree with them.) –  Urs Reupke Aug 9 '12 at 7:43
    
hmm... why? :) Interesting that you asked... I mentioned what are the good practices in which scenario. You weight your situation and decide what to use. So, if you have a method say, int add(int a, int b){returns a+b;} -- it's a good practice to pass a and b. But doing new Additor(a, b).add(); where add(){return this.a + this.b} -- is not so good idea. OP can take answer as thumb rule to come over to any dilemma related to pass argument or not in any situation. Here is the thumb of rule -- "do not create unnecessary objects; do not bloat the parameter list." Got it? –  Nishant Aug 9 '12 at 8:50
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