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writing a subclass of dynamicprops allows to me to add properties dynamically to an object:

addprop(obj, 'new_prop')

this is great, but I would also love to create set / get functions for these properties on the fly. Or analysis functions that work on these dynamic properties.

My experience with Matlab has been so far, that once I create an instance of a class, adding new methods is not possible. That is very cumbersome, because my object may contain a lot of data, which I'll have to re-load everytime that I want to add a new method (because I have to do clear classes).

So is there a way to add methods on the fly?

share|improve this question
    
You can add new methods as long as you do clear classes afterwards, but you want to get around it. I don't think that will work in general. –  user85109 Aug 8 '12 at 10:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You cannot add methods like you add dynamic properties. However, there are two ways for implementing new methods during development that won't require you to re-load the data every time.

(1) I write standard methods as separate functions, and call them as myMethod(obj) during development. Once I'm sure they're stable, I add their signature into the class definition file - this requires a clear classes, of course, but it is a much delayed one, and from time to time you may have to shut down Matlab, anyway.

(2) With set/get methods, things are a little trickier. If you are using dynamicprops to add new properties, you can also specify their set/get methods, however (most likely, these methods/functions will want to receive the name of the property so that they know what to refer to):

addprop(obj,'new_prop');
prop = findprop(obj,'new_prop');
prop.SetMethod = @(obj,val)yourCustomSetMethod(obj,val,'new_prop')

EDIT

(2.1) Here's an example of how to set up a hidden property to store and retrieve results (based on jmlopez' answer). Obviously this can be improved a lot if you have a better idea what you're actually designing

classdef myDynamicClass < dynamicprops
    properties (Hidden)
        name %# class name
        store %# structure that stores the values of the dynamic properties
    end
    methods
        function self = myDynamicClass(clsname, varargin)
            % self = myDynamicClass(clsname, propname, type)
            % here type is a handle to a basic datatype.
            self.name_ = clsname;
            for i=1:2:length(varargin)
                key = varargin{i};
                addprop(self, key);
                prop = findprop(self, key);
                prop.SetMethod = @(obj,val)myDynamicClass.setMethod(obj,val,key);
                prop.GetMethod = @(obj)myDynamicClass.getMethod(obj,key);
            end
        end
        function out = classname(self)
            out = self.name_;
        end
    end
    methods (Static, Hidden) %# you may want to put these in a separate fcn instead
        function setMethod(self,val,key)
           %# have a generic test, for example, force nonempty double
           validateattributes(val,{'double'},{'nonempty'}); %# will error if not double or if empty

           %# store
           self.store.(key) = val;

        end
        function val = getMethod(self,key)
           %# check whether the property exists already, return NaN otherwise
           %# could also use this to load from file if the data is not supposed to be loaded on construction 
           if isfield(self.store,key)
              val = self.store.(key);
           else
              val = NaN;
           end
        end
    end
end
share|improve this answer
    
so myMethod will actually be a generic function (and not a class method) that you can change as you like, right? –  memyself Aug 8 '12 at 11:46
1  
@memyself: exactly. Afterward, you can either copy myMethod into the classdef file, or simply add the signature to the classdef file and move myMethod into the class folder. –  Jonas Aug 8 '12 at 12:17
    
that's a neat trick - I've never thought about it! –  memyself Aug 8 '12 at 12:19
    
@Jonas, is it possible to know what property we are trying to change from within yourCustomMethod? In the example you provided we may have something like obj.new_prop = val; to set the value. Can we access the property name somehow? –  jmlopez Dec 28 '13 at 1:10
1  
@jmlopez: @(obj,val) is an anonymous function that calls setMethod` with the arguments obj,val. Upon construction, arg1 etc are defined in the current workspace, and will passed along to setMetod once it is called. –  Jonas Dec 29 '13 at 7:38

I'm adding this answer because I think that this is not intuitive. At least not to myself at this moment. After finding this question I thought I had what I needed to be able to define the set/get methods for my dynamic class. All I wanted to achieve with this was something similar to what python does with its __setattr__ method. In any case, here is a continuation of the class made by @jonas a while ago with a few modifications to add the our custom set method.

classdef myDynamicClass < dynamicprops
    properties (Hidden)
        name_ %# class name
    end
    methods
        function self = myDynamicClass(clsname, varargin)
            % self = myDynamicClass(clsname, propname, type)
            % here type is a handle to a basic datatype.
            self.name_ = clsname;
            for i=1:2:length(varargin)
                key = varargin{i};
                addprop(self, key);
                prop = findprop(self, key);
                prop.SetMethod = makefunc(key, varargin{i+1});
            end
        end
        function out = classname(self)
            out = self.name_;
        end
    end
end

function h = makefunc(key, argtype)
    h = @newfunc;
    function newfunc(obj, val)
       obj.(key) = argtype(val); 
    end
end

With this class I'm defining the set method so that the parameter passed to the attribute is copied to the right type. To see what I mean consider the following usage:

>> p_int = myDynamicClass('Point', 'x', @int8, 'y', @int32);
>> p_int.x = 1000 

p_int = 

  myDynamicClass with properties:

    y: []
    x: 127

>> class(p_int.x)

ans =

int8

With this we have forced the x attribute to be an integer of 8 bits which can only hold integers from -128 to 127. Also notice how the class of each attribute gives us the intended type.

share|improve this answer
    
This is correct. Note that when defining custom set/get methods, you may run into the risk of infinite recursions, since the Matlab parser will not always know to avoid calling the set method as you assign the value of the property. To make your life easier (also for debugging purposes), it may be helpful to have a hidden property to store the values, that is then accessed by the getter/setter methods. –  Jonas Dec 28 '13 at 9:19
1  
@Jonas great comment - could you elaborate a bit more on the hidden property and how to implement this? –  memyself Dec 28 '13 at 13:40
    
@Jonas, so similar to python __dict__ variable. They mention the possibility of infinite recursion here. Is there some documentation about matlab that explains how to do this? –  jmlopez Dec 28 '13 at 15:29
    
@memyself, jmlopez: I have updated my answer with an example. –  Jonas Dec 28 '13 at 22:14

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