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I'm using Hibernate 3.6.10 to persist a set of objects. Object B contains a reference to Object A:

@Entity
@Table(name = "OBJECT_A")
class ObjectA {
    @Id
    String id;

    @Basic
    String name;
}

@Entity
@Table(name = "OBJECT_B")
class ObjectB {
    @Id
    String id;

    @ManyToOne(optional = false)
    @Cascade({CascadeType.SAVE_UPDATE})
    ObjectA objectA;

    @Basic
    String name;
}

I'm attempting to create new instances of ObjectB with a reference to a persisted ObjectA without first loading the instance of ObjectA from the database. For example:

ObjectA objA = new ObjectA();
objA.id = 42; // same ID as persisted object, but not loaded from db

ObjectB objB = new ObjectB();
objB.objectA = objA;
objB.name = "The Answer";

session.save(objB);

session.save(objB) fails, however:

org.hibernate.PropertyValueException: not-null property references a null or transient value: ObjectA.name
    at org.hibernate.engine.Nullability.checkNullability(Nullability.java:100)

The obvious solution is to load the instance of ObjectA by id, but I'm trying to solve the case where the instance of ObjectB is created by deserializing from JSON:

{
    "ObjectB" : {
        "objectA" : {"id" : 42},
        "name" : "The Answer"
    }
}

I want to solve this for the general case where the code doing the deserialization can work with any mapped Hibernate object without having to know its structure. Given such a deserialized object, I could use reflection to recursively walk all of the mapped fields of ObjectB and "rehydrate" them with their persisted equivalents (probably using Session.merge(…)), but this smells like a solved problem and I don't want to reinvent the wheel.

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2 Answers 2

The problem that you describe is not solved (or solvable with any ORM I know). If you want to hibernate to manage the object relationships, you'll need to either load the object from the DB or call merge(). When you call save(), all the object tree needs to be either tracked by hibernate or new objects that need to be inserted.

The way to avoid this, it to manage the relationships yourself, but this diminishes the value of using hibernate. You could try to check if MyBatis has a feature to support the use you want, as you can manipulate how the objects get persisted.

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I was hoping to find an existing solution, but it seems none exists. So I wrote my own. This isn't thoroughly tested (although I do have a suite of integration tests) and doesn't support all types of Hibernate mappings, but it's working well for my purposes. The source is here. It supports arbitrarily nested objects.

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