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int main()
{
    int* p= (int*)malloc(8);

    for(i=0;i<128;i++)
    p=0;

}

i want to assign all zero's for all 128 bits. Is the above code is correct? i want clarification. my aim is to allocate 128 bits to one varaible and assigning all zero's to all 128 bits.

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10  
Your pretty much confused here. I think you need to start with a basic book on C and pointers –  Pavan Manjunath Aug 8 '12 at 11:06
2  
The smallest addressable unit of storage in C is one byte, which is the content of a char-type variable. A sufficient number (i.e. 128 / CHAR_BIT) of bytes, all set to zero, should do the trick. –  Kerrek SB Aug 8 '12 at 11:08
    
There are 4 bugs here: wrong value of malloc arg, wrong type for p, wrong loop count, wrong assignment to p ... plus an undesirable cast of malloc and bad indentation. You need to pay attention to the difference between bits, bytes, and ints, and to pay attention to your arithmetic. Programming takes discipline, and this code displays none. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:09

7 Answers 7

Use calloc( ) to allocate and zero.

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You can simply use a memset routine to nullify as many bytes as you nned. It will look like this:

uint8_t* p= (uint8_t*)malloc(16);
memset(p, 0, 16);

Please note, if you want 128 bits (which is 16 bytes) you need to replace 8 to 16.

Updated:

Since sizes of integer types are system dependent, using uint8_t typedef makes you confident the type you are working with is really 8 bits long. This typedef (as well as the ones for other integer types of fixed size) can be found in stdint.h. If using this header is not possible, you can create these typedefs yourself e.g. typedef unsigned char uint8_t is true for most of the systems.

If the code is later ported to a system with different integer sizes, you don't have to worry about the problems with size incompatibility - all you need is simply changing (u)intX_t (u - for unsigned, X - number of bits) typedefs.

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1  
Note that we cannot know that 64 or 128 bits is an exact number of ints. int is simply the wrong type to use here. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:17
    
Correct, I think the most portable solution would be to use a typedefs for basic integer types where the particular number of bits is guaranteed (uint8_t) taken either from stdint.h or from a header file of my own where all the platform specific typedefs are. –  Maksim Skurydzin Aug 8 '12 at 12:33
    
Yes, but your answer should reflect that. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:38
    
Note that uint8_t need not be defined, and won't be one a machine without 8-bit bytes. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 14:02

No. You simply assign 0 to the pointer itself (so you lose it and leak memory). Use this:

(Edit: as Jim Balter pointed out, it's easy to handle non-8 bit chars:)

int main()
{
    unsigned n = (128 + CHAR_BIT - 1) / CHAR_BIT;
    unsigned char *p = malloc(n);

    for(i = 0; i < n; i++)
    p[i] = 0;
}

But this is reinventing the wheel. Why not use the standard function memset()?

int main()
{
    unsigned n = (128 + CHAR_BIT - 1) / CHAR_BIT;
    unsigned char *p = malloc(n);

    memset(p, 0, n);
}
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6  
Why memset if you can calloc? –  Kerrek SB Aug 8 '12 at 11:09
    
@KerrekSB because maybe you don't want to write out the multiplication when it's unneeded. Or maybe you want to initialize the array contents to another value later. Nevertheless, this solution is good, yours is also, please don't start trolling me again. –  user529758 Aug 8 '12 at 11:11
    
... +1, small buffer overflow error - you allocate 8 bytes, but you memset 8*sizeof(int) bytes. –  Agnius Vasiliauskas Aug 8 '12 at 11:17
2  
@Motti That is incorrect; the standard does say that a char is a byte. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:29
1  
@JimBalter thanks for the suggestion, I edited my answer. –  user529758 Aug 8 '12 at 12:34

Instead of allocating and clearing it, calloc() would be better I think.

int* p= (int*)malloc(8);

You allocated 8 bytes i.e 8*8 = 64 bits only.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
int main()
{

int i = 0;
char *p = calloc(16, sizeof(char));

//for Testing
for(i = 0; i < 16; i++)
  printf("%d\t", *p++);

return 0;
}
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int sometimes allocates 4 bytes depending on the platform. so use char instead:

char* p= (char*)malloc(16);
for(i=0;i<16;i++)
    p[i]=0;
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1  
Note that a char is not necessarily 8 bits. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:21

Wow, there's just so much to pick apart on that...

1) you allocate 8 bytes, which is 64 bits

2) you iterate to 128, which would cause a buffer overflow, except that:

3) in your loop you only ever set the first byte allocated to 0

there are two ways to do this:

p = malloc(128/8);
for (i = 0; i < (128/8); i++)
    p[i] = 0;

or you can just use the memset(3) function, provided in all POSIX operating systems.

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The OP's loop doesn't set any of the allocated bytes. Also, 8 isn't necessarily the number of bits in a byte; you should use CHAR_BIT. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:19
    
To be even more picky - there are no guarantees in the language that all bits of an int is part of the value. So there could be one or more non-zero bits left, even if the value is set to 0. –  Bo Persson Aug 8 '12 at 14:18

The above code will assign 0 to the pointer, not the content.

To initialize the content, use memset:

memset(p, 0x00, 8);

or dereference the pointer:

for(i=0;i<8;i++)
    p[i]=0;
share|improve this answer
    
What's the type of p? If it's int* as in the OP's example, then the number of bits cleared is unknown, and if it's char*, that only clears 64 bits. –  Jim Balter Aug 8 '12 at 12:12

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