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I'm a noob and still learning the c++ language. The thing is, doing an exercise from a book, I've come across a compiler behavior I don't understand.

The header file.

// stock10.h -- Stock class declaration with constructors, destructor added

#ifndef STOCK10_H_
#define STOCK10_H_

#include <string>

class Stock
{
private:
    std::string company;
    long shares;
    double share_val;
    double total_val;
    void set_tot() { total_val = shares * share_val; }
public:
    // two constructors
    Stock(); // default constructor
    Stock(const std::string & co, long n = 0, double pr = 0.0);
    ~Stock(); // noisy destructor
    void buy(long num, double price);
    void sell(long num, double price);
    void update(double price);
    void show();
};

#endif

The class implementation.

// stock10.cpp -- Stock class with constructors, destructor added

#include <iostream>
#include "stock10.h"

// constructors (verbose versions)
Stock::Stock() // default constructor
{
    std::cout << "Default constructor called\n";
    company = "no name";
    shares = 0;
    share_val = 0.0;
    total_val = 0.0;
}

Stock::Stock(const std::string & co, long n, double pr)
{
    std::cout << "Constructor using " << co << " called\n";
    company = co;
    if (n < 0)
    {
        std::cout << "Number of shares can’t be negative; "
                  << company << " shares set to 0.\n";
        shares = 0;
    }
    else
        shares = n;
    share_val = pr;
    set_tot();
}

// class destructor
Stock::~Stock() // verbose class destructor
{
    std::cout << "Bye, " << company << "!\n";
}

// other methods
void Stock::buy(long num, double price)
{
    if (num < 0)
    {
        std::cout << "Number of shares purchased can’t be negative. "
                  << "Transaction is aborted.\n";
    }
    else
    {
        shares += num;
        share_val = price;
        set_tot();
    }
}

void Stock::sell(long num, double price)
{
    using std::cout;
    if (num < 0)
    {
        cout << "Number of shares sold can’t be negative. "
             << "Transaction is aborted.\n";
    }
    else if (num > shares)
    {
        cout << "You can’t sell more than you have! "
             << "Transaction is aborted.\n";
    }
    else
    {
        shares -= num;
        share_val = price;
        set_tot();
    }
}

void Stock::update(double price)
{
    share_val = price;
    set_tot();
}

void Stock::show()
{
    using std::cout;
    using std::ios_base;
    // set format to #.###
    ios_base::fmtflags orig =
        cout.setf(ios_base::fixed, ios_base::floatfield);
    std::streamsize prec = cout.precision(3);
    cout << "Company: " << company
         << " Shares: " << shares << '\n';
    cout << " Share Price: $" << share_val;
    // set format to #.##
    cout.precision(2);
    cout << " Total Worth: $" << total_val << '\n';
    // restore original format
    cout.setf(orig, ios_base::floatfield);
    cout.precision(prec);
}

The main file.

// usestok1.cpp -- using the Stock class
// compile with stock10.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include "stock10.h"

int main()
{
    {
        using std::cout;
        cout << "Using (non default) constructors to create new objects\n";
        Stock stock1("NanoSmart", 12, 20.0); // syntax 1
        stock1.show();
        Stock stock2 = Stock ("Boffo Objects", 2, 2.0); // syntax 2
        stock2.show();

        cout << "Assigning stock1 to stock2:\n";
        stock2 = stock1;
        cout << "Listing stock1 and stock2:\n";
        stock1.show();
        stock2.show();

        cout << "Using a constructor to reset an object\n";
        stock1 = Stock("Nifty Foods", 10, 50.0); // temp object
        cout << "Revised stock1:\n";
        stock1.show();
        cout << "Done\n";
    }
    std::cin.get();
    return 0;
}

As you may have guessed, Stock is the class and I've created non-default constructor and destructor to display messages to see when they "act".

Here's the output from program execution:

Using (non default) constructors to create new objects
Constructor using NanoSmart called
Company: NanoSmart Shares: 12
Share Price: $20.000 Total Worth: $240.00
Constructor using Boffo Objects called
Company: Boffo Objects Shares: 2
Share Price: $2.000 Total Worth: $4.00
Assigning stock1 to stock2:
Listing stock1 and stock2:
Company NanoSmart Shares: 12
Share Price: $20.000 Total Worth: $240.00
Company NanoSmart Shares: 12
Share Price: $20.000 Total Worth: $240.00
Using a constructor to reset an object
Constructor using Nifty Foods called
Bye, NanoSmart! // Why? Shouldn't it be Bye, Nifty Foods?
Revised stock1:
Company: Nifty Foods Shares: 10
Share Price: $50.000 Total Worth: $500.00
Done
Bye, NanoSmart!
Bye, Nifty Foods!

In this specific line:

stock1 = Stock("Nifty Foods", 10, 50.0); // temp object

Shouldn't the compiler:
1. Create a temporary object with the constructor
2. Assign that object to the stock1 object
3. Destroy the temporary object

Shouldn't the message say Nifty Foods instead of NanoSmart?

I don't get it. Any help?

share|improve this question
1  
You better show us your class before we could possible answer your question. At least the class declaration, copy-constructor and assignment operator (if you implemented one, which you probably should otherwise). –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 8 '12 at 11:26
    
@Joachim Pileborg sorry for that. I added the class implementation file. –  Kurospidey Aug 8 '12 at 11:34
    
Could you please add the header file as well? We might need to see how you declare the class member variables as well. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 8 '12 at 11:37
    
@Joachim Pileborg done! –  Kurospidey Aug 8 '12 at 11:38
1  
I cannot reproduce your output. I get Bye, Nifty foods!. –  juanchopanza Aug 8 '12 at 11:44

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You don't have a assignment operator defined, so if you are using a C++11 compiler, it probably uses the move assignment operator, which swaps the objects and then deletes the new contents of the temp object, which used to be in stock1.

At least, that is the observed behavior. ecatmur is correct, however, that your class should not have received an implicit move assignment operator. That might of course be a compiler bug.

share|improve this answer
    
But I'm not creating the object. It's already created. in your example is bar = Foo(something). bar is already created –  Kurospidey Aug 8 '12 at 11:46
    
@Kurospidey When you do stock1 = Stock("Nifty Foods", 10, 50.0);, the compiler will create a temporary object, then use the assignment operator of stock1to copy the temporary object. If you don't have your own assignment operator then the one generated by the compiler may do the wrong things. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 8 '12 at 11:50
    
@JoachimPileborg that i understand. but after that, shouldn't it destroy that temporary object? so the message should be "Bye, Nifty Foods" cause it's destroying the object with the company name Nifty Foods. Instead it says "Bye, NanoSmart" like if it were destroying the stock1 object, which it shouldn't –  Kurospidey Aug 8 '12 at 11:54
    
Sorry, I meant the assignment operators. Same thing, though. Note that after using the move assignment operator, the temp object may very well hold the contents that stock1 used to have. –  Christopher Creutzig Aug 8 '12 at 11:54
1  
@ChristopherCreutzig the move assignment operator is suppressed per 12.8:20 by the user-declared destructor. –  ecatmur Aug 8 '12 at 11:59

You haven't written a copy assignment operator Stock::operator=(const Stock &) or move assignment operator Stock::operator=(Stock &&), so your assignment stock1 = Stock("Nifty Foods", 10, 50.0); will invoke an implicitly defined copy/move assignment operator:

12.8 Copying and moving class objects [class.copy]

18 - If the class definition does not explicitly declare a copy assignment operator, one is declared implicitly. If the class definition declares a move constructor or move assignment operator, the implicitly declared copy assignment operator is defined as deleted; otherwise, it is defined as defaulted (8.4).
28 - The implicitly-defined copy/move assignment operator for a non-union class X performs memberwise copy- /move assignment of its subobjects.

Because your class has a user-defined destructor, the move assignment operator will not be implicitly defined (12.8:20), so the implicitly defined copy assignment operator will be called:

20 - If the definition of a class X does not explicitly declare a move assignment operator, one will be implicitly declared as defaulted if and only if [...]

  • X does not have a user-declared destructor

Thus the Stock("Nifty Foods", 10, 50.0) will be memberwise copied into stock1 and then destructed; so the message displayed will be "Bye, Nifty Foods!".

Here's a SSCCE:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
struct S {
    std::string s;
    S(const std::string &s): s(s) { std::cout << "S(" << s << ")\n"; }
    ~S() { std::cout << "~S(" << s << ")\n"; }
};
int main() {
    S a("a");
    a = S("b");
}

Output:

S(a)
S(b)
~S(b)
~S(b)
share|improve this answer
    
The question is, why isn't that message displayed. OP claims Bye, NanoSmart! is printed. –  juanchopanza Aug 8 '12 at 11:55
    
@juanchopanza OP is incorrect or is using a non-conformant implementation. –  ecatmur Aug 8 '12 at 11:57
    
It looks like it. I haven't been able to reproduce it on a variety of GCCs. –  juanchopanza Aug 8 '12 at 12:03
    
Thanks for the comments guys. I'm using mingw (probably a strange version) –  Kurospidey Aug 8 '12 at 12:09

I don't see anything immediately wrong with your code, but you should probably implement a copy-constructor and assignment operator anyway, just to be sure that copying is performed correctly.

something like this:

class Stock
{
    // ...

public:
    // ...

    Stock(const Stock &other)
        : company(other.company), shares(other.shares),
          share_val(other.share_val), total_val(other.total_val)
        { }

    Stock &operator=(const Stock &other)
        {
            company   = other.company;
            shares    = other.shares;
            share_val = other.share_val;
            total_val = other.total_val;

            return *this;
        }

    // ...
};

For more information about copy-constructors, see e.g. this Wikipedia article. For the assignment operator, see e.g. this article.

share|improve this answer
1  
A copy constructor/assignment that just does what the default one would do is redundant and a potential source for errors. You usually don't need them if the class doesn't have pointer members. –  ibid Aug 8 '12 at 11:53
    
Thanks for your answer. The thing is I'm following a book while learning the language. And in this particular exercise the author claims the program output should be that one with the tools I'm using right now. I think it should be that one also, but the compiler thinks otherwise, and I don't know why. –  Kurospidey Aug 8 '12 at 11:57
    
@ibid In this case the compiler defaults obviously does something wrong, or the OP wouldn't have posted the question. –  Joachim Pileborg Aug 8 '12 at 11:57
1  
@JoachimPileborg, did you try the OP's code? Did you reproduce the OP's anomalous result, and did your suggestion fix it for you? For me, the OP's code works correctly with no changes. –  ibid Aug 9 '12 at 7:09

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