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I'm trying to find the "best" way to set default values for objects in rails. Best I can think of is to set the default value in the "new" method in the controller. Anyone have any input on if this is acceptable or if there's a better way to do it?

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1  
What are these objects; how are they consumed / used ? Are they used while rendering the views or for controller logic ? –  Gishu Jul 27 '09 at 4:19
2  
If you are talking about an ActiveRecord object I have to tell you that there's no sane solution to the 'default values' problem. Only insane hacks, and the rails authors don't seem to think that the feature is worth it (amazing as only the rails community is..) –  Mauricio Nov 19 '10 at 18:39
    
Since the accepted and most answers focus on ActiveRecords, we assume the the original question was about AcitveRecords. Therefore possible duplicate of stackoverflow.com/questions/328525/… –  Ciro Santilli Jan 14 at 20:51
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13 Answers 13

up vote 48 down vote accepted

"Correct" is a dangerous word in Ruby. There's usually more than one way to do anything. If you know you'll always want that default value for that column on that table, setting them in a DB migration file is the easiest way:

class SetDefault < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    change_column :people, :last_name, :default => "Doe"
  end

  def self.down
    # You can't currently remove default values in Rails
    raise ActiveRecord::IrreversibleMigration, "Can't remove the default"
  end
end

Because ActiveRecord autodiscovers your table and column properties, this will cause the same default to be set in any model using it in any standard Rails app.

However, if you only want default values set in specific cases -- say, it's an inherited model that shares a table with some others -- then another elegant way is do it directly in your Rails code when the model object is created:

class GenericPerson < Person
  def initialize(attributes=nil)
    attr_with_defaults = {:last_name => "Doe"}.merge(attributes)
    super(attr_with_defaults)
  end
end

Then, when you do a GenericPerson.new(), it'll always trickle the "Doe" attribute up to Person.new() unless you override it with something else.

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Second option is actually not gonna work: 3hv.co.uk/blog/2009/06/03/… But thanks for the migration snippet! –  Nikita Rybak Jun 18 '10 at 22:50
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Try it. It'll work on new model objects called with the .new class method. That blog post's discussion about ActiveRecord directly calling .allocate was about model objects loaded with existing data from the database. (And it's a terrible idea for ActiveRecord to work that way, IMO. But that's beside the point.) –  SFEley Mar 10 '11 at 7:55
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If you step back to read the original poster's question again, Nikita, and then my comments in order, it may make more sense to you. If not... Well, the question's been answered. Have a nice day. –  SFEley Mar 22 '11 at 3:06
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Better for the down migration: change_column_default :people, :last_name, nil stackoverflow.com/a/1746246/483520 –  Nolan Jul 19 '12 at 19:29
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Please note that for newer rails versions, you need an additional type parameter before the default parameter. Search for :type on this page. –  Benjamin Wheeler Mar 20 at 15:47
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Based on SFEley's answer, here is an updated/fixed one for newer Rails versions:

class SetDefault < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def change
    change_column :table_name, :column_name, :type, default: "Your value"
  end
end
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First of all you can't overload initialize(*args) as it's not called in all cases.

Your best option is to put your defaults into your migration.

add_column :accounts, :max_users, :integer, :default => 10

Second best is to place defaults into your model but this will only work with attributes that are initially nil. You may have trouble as I did with boolean columns.

def after_initialize
  if new_record?
    max_users ||= 10
  end
end

You need the new_record? so the defaults don't override values loaded from the datbase.

You need ||= to stop rails overriding parameters passed into the initialize method.

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8  
minor note -- you want to do two things:.... 1) don't call your method after_initialize. You want after_initiation :your_method_name.... 2 use self.max_users ||= 10 –  Jesse Wolgamott Feb 3 '12 at 21:43
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For booleans, just do this: prop = true if prop.nil? –  Francis Potter Mar 18 '12 at 18:26
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or after_initialize do instead of def after_initialize –  fotanus Aug 7 '13 at 17:08
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You can also try change_column_default in your migrations (tested in Rails 3.2.8):

class SetDefault < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    # Set default value
    change_column_default :people, :last_name, "Smith"
  end

  def down
    # Remove default
    change_column_default :people, :last_name, nil
  end
end

change_column_default Rails API docs

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If you are referring to ActiveRecord objects, you have (more than) two ways of doing this:

1. Use a :default parameter in the DB

E.G.

class AddSsl < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    add_column :accounts, :ssl_enabled, :boolean, :default => true
  end

  def self.down
    remove_column :accounts, :ssl_enabled
  end
end

More info here: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Migration.html

2. Use a callback

E.G. before_validation_on_create

More info here: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Callbacks.html#M002147

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Isn't the problem with using defaults in the database that they don't get set til the object is saved? If I want to construct a new object with the defaults populated, I need to set them in the initializer. –  Rafe Jul 27 '09 at 6:00
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+1 for callbacks. –  sholsinger Sep 5 '11 at 18:39
    
Booleans can't default to 1 or 0 -- they must be set to true or false (see Silasj's answer). –  Jamon Holmgren Jul 6 '12 at 16:32
    
@JamonHolmgren Thanks for the remark, I corrected the answer :) –  Vlad Zloteanu Dec 3 '12 at 19:58
    
No problem @VladZloteanu –  Jamon Holmgren Dec 3 '12 at 23:14
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In Ruby on Rails v3.2.8, using the after_initialize ActiveRecord callback, you can call a method in your model that will assign the default values for a new object.

after_initialize callback is triggered for each object that is found and instantiated by a finder, with after_initialize being triggered after new objects are instantiated as well (see ActiveRecord Callbacks).

So, IMO it should look something like:

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  after_initialize :assign_defaults_on_new_Foo
  ...
  attr_accessible :bar
  ...
  private
  def assign_defaults_on_new_Foo
    # required to check an attribute for existence to weed out existing records
    self.bar = default_value unless self.attribute_whose_presence_has_been_validated
  end
end

Foo.bar = default_value for this instance unless the instance contains an attribute_whose_presence_has_been_validated previously on save/update. The default_value will then be used in conjunction with your view to render the form using the default_value for the bar attribute.

At best this is hacky...

EDIT - use 'new_record?' to check if instantiating from a new call

Instead of checking an attribute value, use the new_record? built-in method with rails. So, the above example should look like:

class Foo < ActiveRecord::Base
  after_initialize :assign_defaults_on_new_Foo, if: 'new_record?'
  ...
  attr_accessible :bar
  ...
  private
  def assign_defaults_on_new_Foo
    self.bar = default_value
  end
end

This is much cleaner. Ah, the magic of Rails - it's smarter than me.

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This doesn't work as I expected - it was supposed to only set the default on new, but it also sets the default to the attribute for each object that is found and instantiated (i.e. records loaded from the db). You can do a check an object attribute looking for values before assigning the default, but that is not a very elegant or robust solution. –  erroric Oct 11 '12 at 13:35
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Why you recommend after_initialize callback here ? Rails documentation on callbacks has example of setting default value in before_create without extra condition checks –  Dfr Jan 15 '13 at 16:23
    
@Dfr - I must have missed that, can you throw me a link to review and I'll update the answer... –  erroric Jan 17 '13 at 14:00
    
Yes, here api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/Callbacks.html first example, class Subscription –  Dfr Jan 17 '13 at 14:56
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@Dfr - The reason that we are using the after_initialize, instead of the before_create callback, is we want to set a default value for the user (for use in a view) when they are creating new objects. The before_create callback is called after the user has been served a new object, provided their input, and submitted the object for creation to the controller. The controller then checks for any before_create callbacks. It's seems counter-intuitive, but it a nomenclature thing - before_create refers to the create action. Instantiating a new object does not create the object. –  erroric Jan 22 '13 at 15:55
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For boolean fields in Rails 3.2.6 at least, this will work in your migration.

def change
  add_column :users, :eula_accepted, :boolean, default: false
end

Putting a 1 or 0 for a default will not work here, since it is a boolean field. It must be a true or false value.

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If you are just setting defaults for certain attributes of a database backed model I'd consider using sql default column values - can you clarify what types of defaults you are using?

There are a number of approaches to handle it, this plugin looks like an interesting option.

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I think you shouldn't depend on database to deal with defaults and constraints, all that stuff should be sorted out in model layer. That plugin works only for ActiveRecord models, it's not generic way to set defaults for objects. –  Lukas Stejskal Jul 27 '09 at 9:51
    
I'd argue that it depends on the types of defaults you are trying to use, it'd not something I've needed to do very often but I'd say constraints are in fact much better off being set in both the database and the model - to prevent your data from becoming invalid in the database. –  paulthenerd Jul 27 '09 at 13:47
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The suggestion to override new/initialize is probably incomplete. Rails will (frequently) call allocate for ActiveRecord objects, and calls to allocate won't result in calls to initialize.

If you're talking about ActiveRecord objects, take a look at overriding after_initialize.

These blog posts (not mine) are useful:

Default values Default constructors not called

[Edit: SFEley points out that Rails actually does look at the default in the database when it instantiates a new object in memory - I hadn't realized that.]

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I needed to set a default just as if it was specified as default column value in DB. So it behaves like this

a = Item.new
a.published_at # => my default value

a = Item.new(:published_at => nil)
a.published_at # => nil

Because after_initialize callback is called after setting attributes from arguments, there was no way to know if the attribute is nil because it was never set or because it was intentionally set as nil. So I had to poke inside a bit and came with this simple solution.

class Item < ActiveRecord::Base
  def self.column_defaults
    super.merge('published_at' => Time.now)
  end
end

Works great for me. (Rails 3.2.x)

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i answered a similar question here.. a clean way to do this is using Rails attr_accessor_with_default

class SOF
  attr_accessor_with_default :is_awesome,true
end

sof = SOF.new
sof.is_awesome

=> true

UPDATE

attr_accessor_with_default has been deprecated in Rails 3.2.. you could do this instead with pure Ruby

class SOF
  attr_writer :is_awesome

  def is_awesome
    @is_awesome ||= true
  end
end

sof = SOF.new
sof.is_awesome

#=> true
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attr_accessor_with_default is deprecated as of rails > 3.1.0 –  flynfish May 11 '12 at 22:46
    
ye i know.. editing... –  Orlando May 11 '12 at 22:59
    
In your example, is_awesome will always be true even when @is_awesome == false. –  Ritchie Jun 5 '12 at 6:46
    
whoopps.. fixed :) –  Orlando Jun 5 '12 at 13:45
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If you're talking about ActiveRecord objects, I use the 'attribute-defaults' gem.

Documentation & download: https://github.com/bsm/attribute-defaults

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You can override the constructor for the ActiveRecord model.

Like this:

def initialize(*args)
  super(*args)
  self.attribute_that_needs_default_value ||= default_value
  self.attribute_that_needs_another_default_value ||= another_default_value
  #ad nauseum
end
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1  
This is a terrible place to go about changing core rails functionality. There are other much stable less likely to break other things, ways to do this mentioned in other answers. Monkey patching should only be a last resort for things that cannot possibly be done any other way. –  Will Jul 12 '12 at 3:57
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