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CallingClass::CallingFunc()
{
    SomeClass obj;
    obj.Construct(*Singleton::GetInstance()); // passing the listener
    // Singleton::GetInstance() returns a static pointer.
    //Singleton is derived from IListener
}

SomeClass::Construct(const IListener &listener)
{
    IListener* pListener = const_cast<IListener*>(&listener);
}

After const_cast pListener is null. Is it possible to perform such typecasting?

Thanks

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What exactly fails? Do you have problem at compilation time? Runtime? I don't see anything wrong in the SomeClass::Construct member function. –  bitmask Aug 8 '12 at 12:12
1  
are you serious, a GetInstance() that returns a pointer to a singleton???? Gheesh, that's the epitomy of ugly code! –  Tony The Lion Aug 8 '12 at 12:14
    
After const_cast pListener is null. –  yogesh singh Aug 8 '12 at 12:15
    
I think the const_cast might have to be moved after the & operator, but can't test right now. Before you try to cast away the const, you're already asking for the address of a const reference, which is strange. –  Joao Tavora Aug 8 '12 at 12:15
    
@TonyTheLion: I am sorry, but isnt that way the singleton is written. I did not understand your concerns.Can you pls elaborate? –  yogesh singh Aug 8 '12 at 12:18
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3 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Two questions:

  1. What are you trying to acheive here?
  2. How much control have you got over the code? (i.e. what are you able to change?)

Without wishing to be unkind I would honestly say that it might be better to start again. There are a couple of issues I would have with this code:

Firstly, the Singleton pattern should ensure that only one of a specific object is ever created, therefore it is usually returned by pointer, reference or some derivative thereof (i.e. boost shared pointer etc.) It need not necessarily be const though and the fact that it is here indicates that the author did not intend it to be used in a non-const way.

Second, you're then passing this object by reference into a function. No need. That's the one of the major features (and drawbacks) of the singleton pattern: You can access it from anywhere. So you could just as easily write:

SomeClass::Construct()
{
    IListener* pListener = const_cast<IListener*>(*Singleton::GetInstance());
}

Although this still doesn't really help you. One thing it does do is make your interface a bit clearer. You see, when you write SomeClass::Construct(const IListener&listener) anyone reading your could reasonably imply that listener is treated as const within the function and by using const_cast, you've broken that implied contract. This is a very good reason that you should not use const_cast - at least not in these circumstances.

The fundamental question that you need to ask yourself is when your IListener is const, why do you need to use it in a non-const way within Construct? Either the singleton should not return a const object or your function should not need it to be non-const.

This is a design issue that you need to sort out before you take any further steps.

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:Thanks for your reply, I have absolutely no control over Construct Method. its An API of a platform. I have just made an application which passes the singleton reference so that i can handle call back anywhere in the application.what I wanted to know was can we perform const_cast on a static pointer? –  yogesh singh Aug 9 '12 at 3:58
    
So are you saying that you are stuck with someone elses code which takes a const reference and then casts away the constness to make it a non-const pointer? If so you should tell them how very poor their code is and you should ask them to change it for the reasons mentioned above. As to your question, there is no difference in applying const_cast to a static pointer. –  Component 10 Aug 9 '12 at 14:58
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So let me see. You have two-phase initialization, a Singleton, and casting away const, and you're de-referencing an object just to take it's address again? A stray NULL pointer is the least of your concerns, my friend.

Throw it away and write it again from scratch. And pick up a C++ book first.

Just so you know, const_cast cannot produce a null pointer unless it was passed one. GetInstance() must be returning NULL to produce this behaviour, which is formally UB as soon as you de-reference it.

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Although this doesn't remotely answer the question, I couldn't help but +1. –  bitmask Aug 8 '12 at 12:17
    
GetInstance() is not returning null. I checked it. I need to derefer because Constuct takes a reference as parameter. Could you please suggest correct way of doing this? I am new to programing. –  yogesh singh Aug 8 '12 at 12:20
    
@DeadMG:Thanks for your reply, I have absolutely no control over Construct Method. its An API of a platform. I have just made an application which passes the singleton reference so that i can handle call back anywhere in the application.what I wanted to know was can we perform const_cast on a static pointer? – yogesh singh 36 secs ago –  yogesh singh Aug 9 '12 at 4:00
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const_cast is basically an instruction to the compiler to ignore the constness of something. Use of it is to be avoided, because you are overriding the compiler protection, and it can lead to a crash as you write something that attempts to update read-only memory.

However, it doesn't actually cause any code to be generated.

Therefore, if this:

IListener* pListener = const_cast<IListener*>(&listener);

results in pListener being NULL, then &listener is NULL, which is impossible (or you are returning a null reference for your singleton, or you are missing something out from your description of the problem).

Having said which I agree strongly with the answer from DeadMG.

Creating an empty object and doing an Init on it (2-phase construction) is to be avoided. Properly created objects should be valid, and if you have an Init method, it isn't.

Removing the constness from anything is to be avoided - it is extremely likely to produce surprising behaviour.

The amount of de-and-rereferencing in that code is going to give anyone a headache.

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2  
You should probably mention who wrote "the above answer" is, because the order shifts around sometimes. –  Ryan Amos Aug 8 '12 at 13:24
    
oh, yeah, I forgot it did that. Thanks –  Tom Tanner Aug 8 '12 at 14:32
    
@RyanAmos:Thanks for your reply, I have absolutely no control over Construct Method. its An API of a platform. I have just made an application which passes the singleton reference so that i can handle call back anywhere in the application.what I wanted to know was can we perform const_cast on a static pointer? – yogesh singh 36 secs ago –  yogesh singh Aug 9 '12 at 3:59
    
you can perform const_cast on a static pointer. However, just because you can do something doesn't mean you should. –  Tom Tanner Aug 9 '12 at 7:14
    
@TomTanner: I have debugged and checked. My singleton is not returning null. It is only after casting it becomes null. I just want to know what makes that happen? –  yogesh singh Aug 9 '12 at 8:17
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