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I need to fix a problem with a missing primary key, and I would like to get some ideas on the best way to do it.

We have a program on several production databases where we insert new data every hour into a sum table. Five of columns are the key and the other columns are values which is different sums. We use ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE to add to the sums at every insert. The insert statement looks something like this:

INSERT INTO sums (key1,key2,key3,key4,key5,sum1,sum2) VALUES (..., 13, 42, 3)
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE sum1=VALUES(sum1)+sum1,sum2=VALUES(sum2)+sum2

The thing is when the table was created the primary key was not set (not my fault :). Now I need to aggregate the rows that has the same keys and then add the primary key. Due to the missing primary key the table has grown to around 700 000 000 rows on a few systems, so I need some efficient way to do this.

I would like to do it without having to postpone the adding of new lines every hour. Because in the way the system works now saving the inserts and doing them later will require a lot of work.

Every single operation I do can't lock the table for more that 45 minutes or so. I hope that creating the actual primary key will take shorter than that if I manage to merge some rows first. Maybe it is faster to create an index for a few of the keys columns first so I have an index to use for aggregating rows operations?

I am not sure what the best way to aggregate the rows are either. Any good suggestions would be appreciated.

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Is any of the keys 1 to 5 chronological? So that you can identify rows which have been added after a certain point in time? In that case I'd run the aggregation queries in chunks - first the 1st million rows, then the 2nd and so on - and copy the aggregated results in a new table. This might be fast enough so that you don't lock the tables for too long and that you can switch to the new table after the last run in less than 45 minutes. –  Alex Monthy Aug 8 '12 at 12:39
    
Yes, one of the key columns is date based. I guess for the actual merging I will need to do it by chunks. Maybe the best way to start is to add an index for the date based column and see how long time that takes. I guess it is faster to build an index with a few values than an index for all keys at once. –  ygram Aug 8 '12 at 12:44
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

First, rename your existing sums table to sums_old and create the new, correct sums table, so you can keep your hourly process going. Realize, however, that until you apply the aggregated data, the data in the sums table will not be correct.

Now, apply the following query to update the table:

INSERT INTO sums (key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2)
SELECT key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2 FROM sums_old
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE sum1 = VALUES(sum1) + sum1, sum2 = VALUES(sum2) + sum2

But wait, since you're using MyISAM, and you don't want the table locked too long, do it in chunks with LIMIT:

INSERT INTO sums (key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2)
SELECT key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2 FROM sums_old
ORDER BY some_index
LIMIT 0, 250000
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE sum1 = VALUES(sum1) + sum1, sum2 = VALUES(sum2) + sum2

INSERT INTO sums (key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2)
SELECT key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2 FROM sums_old
ORDER BY some_index
LIMIT 250000, 250000
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE sum1 = VALUES(sum1) + sum1, sum2 = VALUES(sum2) + sum2

INSERT INTO sums (key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2)
SELECT key1, key2, key3, key4, key5, sum1, sum2 FROM sums_old
ORDER BY some_index
LIMIT 500000, 250000
ON DUPLICATE KEY UPDATE sum1 = VALUES(sum1) + sum1, sum2 = VALUES(sum2) + sum2

...

You'll need to order by some key to do it in chunks, so if you don't have one, you'll need to add it to the sums_old table.

Figure out what a good chunk size is.

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To create a new table and let the hourly process insert in that one is a really good idea. I just need to convince some customers that getting incorrect data for a while is better than getting no data (what is happening now since every query is a full table scan). –  ygram Aug 8 '12 at 14:07
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I would say to try something like this to agregate them

select key1,key2,key3,k4,key5,
convert(key1 as varchar) + convert(key2 as varchar) + convert(key3 as varchar) + convert(k4 as varchar) + convert(key5 as varchar) as Pk
from sums
group by key1,key2,key3,k4,key5
having distinct(convert(key1 as varchar) + convert(key2 as varchar) + convert(key3 as varchar) + convert(k4 as varchar) + convert(key5 as varchar))

I don't envy you, 700M is allot, an operation like the one you want to do should take allot of time i think.

Hope this helps

Cheers

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