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Reading Oracle documentation, I see that by default JKS files are encrypted using PBEWithMD5AndTripleDES. While DES alone makes me feel uneasy, MD5 lights a big red light. I'd like to use PBEWithSHA256And256BitAES-CBC-BC or PBEWithSHA256And128bitAES-CBC-BC to encrypt private keys.

Do I have to write new Cryptography Service Provider implementing whole KeyStore interface or is it possible to parametrise the creation of KeyStore (either using plain java or BouncyCastle)?

EDIT: A little bit of background.

I know that 3DES isn't broken, just as is MD5 used as KDF (or in PBE). The problem is, that this is the situation for now. For all we know, MD5 may be broken to the level MD4 is broken tomorrow. My application life is at least 10 years, and it's very likely it's much more. Somehow I don't see people after those 10 years delving deep into working crypto code just because it may not be secure. One just needs to look at last few of the big "mishaps" with password leaks to see how likely is that, and that were obvious things to anyone that saw the raw database.

That being said: NSA crypto suite B allows only AES for symmetric encryption, of any kind. NIST list only SHA-1 and SHA-2 algorithms for HMAC and KDF use, while SHA-1 use is not recommended. Suite B allows only SHA-2 hash functions. Those algorithms are publicly available, so why shouldn't I use them?

share|improve this question
    
TripleDES is not DES. TripleDES is secure. –  mikeazo Aug 8 '12 at 16:37
    
@mikeazo: I know that DES and tripe DES aren't the same thing, but even 3DES gives you at best 112bits of security. As for real assessment of security: NSA doesn't agree, Suite B allows only AES. Still, the bigger problem is use of MD5 and SHA-1. –  Hubert Kario Aug 8 '12 at 21:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In the end I went with PKCS#8 files encrypted using PBEWithSHA256And256BitAES-CBC-BC

Encryption:

import java.io.FileOutputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.security.AlgorithmParameters;
import java.security.InvalidAlgorithmParameterException;
import java.security.InvalidKeyException;
import java.security.KeyPair;
import java.security.KeyPairGenerator;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.NoSuchProviderException;
import java.security.SecureRandom;
import java.security.Security;
import java.security.spec.InvalidKeySpecException;
import java.security.spec.InvalidParameterSpecException;

import javax.crypto.BadPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo;
import javax.crypto.IllegalBlockSizeException;
import javax.crypto.NoSuchPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.SecretKey;
import javax.crypto.SecretKeyFactory;
import javax.crypto.spec.PBEKeySpec;
import javax.crypto.spec.PBEParameterSpec;

import org.bouncycastle.asn1.bc.BCObjectIdentifiers;

public class EncodePKCS8 {

/**
 * @param args
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException 
 * @throws InvalidKeySpecException 
 * @throws NoSuchPaddingException 
 * @throws InvalidAlgorithmParameterException 
 * @throws InvalidKeyException 
 * @throws BadPaddingException 
 * @throws IllegalBlockSizeException 
 * @throws InvalidParameterSpecException 
 * @throws IOException 
 * @throws NoSuchProviderException 
 */
public static void main(String[] args) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException,
InvalidKeySpecException, NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException,
InvalidAlgorithmParameterException, IllegalBlockSizeException, BadPaddingException,
InvalidParameterSpecException, IOException, NoSuchProviderException
{
    // before we can do anything with BouncyCastle we have to register its provider
    Security.addProvider(new org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider());

    String password = "Very long and complex password";

    // generate RSA key pair
    KeyPairGenerator keyPairGenerator = KeyPairGenerator.getInstance("RSA");
    keyPairGenerator.initialize(2048);
    KeyPair keyPair = keyPairGenerator.genKeyPair();

    byte[] encryptedPkcs8 = encryptPrivateKey(password, keyPair);

    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream("privkey.p8");
    fos.write(encryptedPkcs8);
    fos.close();

    return;
}

private static byte[] encryptPrivateKey(String password, KeyPair keyPair)
    throws InvalidKeyException, NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchProviderException,
    InvalidKeySpecException, NoSuchPaddingException,
    InvalidAlgorithmParameterException, IllegalBlockSizeException,
    BadPaddingException, InvalidParameterSpecException, IOException
{
    int count = 100000; // hash iteration count, best to leave at default or increase
    return encryptPrivateKey(password, keyPair, count);
}

/**
 * 
 * @param password
 * @param keyPair
 * @param count
 * @return PKCS#8 encoded, encrypted keyPair
 * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException
 * @throws NoSuchProviderException
 * @throws InvalidKeySpecException
 * @throws NoSuchPaddingException
 * @throws InvalidKeyException
 * @throws InvalidAlgorithmParameterException
 * @throws IllegalBlockSizeException
 * @throws BadPaddingException
 * @throws InvalidParameterSpecException
 * @throws IOException
 */
private static byte[] encryptPrivateKey(String password, 
        KeyPair keyPair, int count) throws NoSuchAlgorithmException,
        NoSuchProviderException, InvalidKeySpecException,
        NoSuchPaddingException, InvalidKeyException,
        InvalidAlgorithmParameterException, IllegalBlockSizeException,
        BadPaddingException, InvalidParameterSpecException, IOException
{
    // extract the encoded private key, this is an unencrypted PKCS#8 private key
        byte[] encodedprivkey = keyPair.getPrivate().getEncoded();

        // Use a PasswordBasedEncryption (PBE) algorithm, OID of this algorithm will be saved
        // in the PKCS#8 file, so changing it (when more standard algorithm or safer
        // algorithm is available) doesn't break backwards compatibility.
        // In other words, decryptor doesn't need to know the algorithm before it will be
        // able to decrypt the PKCS#8 object.
        String encAlg = BCObjectIdentifiers.bc_pbe_sha256_pkcs12_aes256_cbc.getId();

        SecureRandom random = new SecureRandom();
        byte[] salt = new byte[16];
        random.nextBytes(salt);

        // Create PBE parameter set
        PBEParameterSpec pbeParamSpec = new PBEParameterSpec(salt, count);
        PBEKeySpec pbeKeySpec = new PBEKeySpec(password.toCharArray());
        SecretKeyFactory keyFac = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance(encAlg, "BC");
        SecretKey pbeKey = keyFac.generateSecret(pbeKeySpec);

        Cipher pbeCipher = Cipher.getInstance(encAlg, "BC");

        // Initialize PBE Cipher with key and parameters
        pbeCipher.init(Cipher.ENCRYPT_MODE, pbeKey, pbeParamSpec);

        // Encrypt the encoded Private Key with the PBE key
        byte[] ciphertext = pbeCipher.doFinal(encodedprivkey);

        // Now construct  PKCS #8 EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo object
        AlgorithmParameters algparms = AlgorithmParameters.getInstance(encAlg, "BC");
        algparms.init(pbeParamSpec);
        EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo encinfo = new EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo(algparms, ciphertext);

        // DER encoded PKCS#8 encrypted key
        byte[] encryptedPkcs8 = encinfo.getEncoded();

        return encryptedPkcs8;
    }
}

Decryption:

import java.io.File;
import java.io.FileInputStream;
import java.io.IOException;
import java.security.AlgorithmParameters;
import java.security.InvalidAlgorithmParameterException;
import java.security.InvalidKeyException;
import java.security.Key;
import java.security.KeyFactory;
import java.security.NoSuchAlgorithmException;
import java.security.PrivateKey;
import java.security.PublicKey;
import java.security.Security;
import java.security.interfaces.RSAKey;
import java.security.interfaces.RSAPrivateCrtKey;
import java.security.interfaces.RSAPublicKey;
import java.security.spec.InvalidKeySpecException;
import java.security.spec.KeySpec;
import java.security.spec.RSAPublicKeySpec;

import javax.crypto.Cipher;
import javax.crypto.EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo;
import javax.crypto.NoSuchPaddingException;
import javax.crypto.SecretKeyFactory;
import javax.crypto.spec.PBEKeySpec;

public class DecodePKCS8 {

    /**
     * @param args
     * @throws IOException 
     * @throws NoSuchPaddingException When file is corrupted
     * @throws NoSuchAlgorithmException When no BC provider has been loaded 
     * @throws InvalidKeySpecException When decryption of file failed
     * @throws InvalidAlgorithmParameterException When file is corrupted
     * @throws InvalidKeyException When Unlimited cryptography extensions are not installed
     */
    public static void main(String[] args) throws
    IOException, NoSuchAlgorithmException, NoSuchPaddingException,
    InvalidKeySpecException, InvalidKeyException, InvalidAlgorithmParameterException
    {
        // before we can do anything with BouncyCastle we have to register its provider
        Security.addProvider(new org.bouncycastle.jce.provider.BouncyCastleProvider());

        String password = "Very long and complex password";

        // read DER encoded key from files
        byte[] encodedprivkey = getFileBytes("privkey.p8");

        // this is a encoded PKCS#8 encrypted private key
        EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo ePKInfo = new EncryptedPrivateKeyInfo(encodedprivkey);

        // first we have to read algorithm name and parameters (salt, iterations) used
        // to encrypt the file
        Cipher cipher = Cipher.getInstance(ePKInfo.getAlgName());
        PBEKeySpec pbeKeySpec = new PBEKeySpec(password.toCharArray());

        SecretKeyFactory skFac = SecretKeyFactory.getInstance(ePKInfo
                .getAlgName());
        Key pbeKey = skFac.generateSecret(pbeKeySpec);

        // Extract the iteration count and the salt
        AlgorithmParameters algParams = ePKInfo.getAlgParameters();
        cipher.init(Cipher.DECRYPT_MODE, pbeKey, algParams);

        // Decrypt the encryped private key into a PKCS8EncodedKeySpec
        KeySpec pkcs8KeySpec = ePKInfo.getKeySpec(cipher);

        // Now retrieve the RSA Public and private keys by using an
        // RSA key factory.
        KeyFactory rsaKeyFac = KeyFactory.getInstance("RSA");
        // First get the private key
        PrivateKey rsaPriv = rsaKeyFac.generatePrivate(pkcs8KeySpec);
        // Now derive the RSA public key from the private key
        RSAPublicKeySpec rsaPubKeySpec = new RSAPublicKeySpec(((RSAKey) rsaPriv).getModulus(),
                ((RSAPrivateCrtKey) rsaPriv).getPublicExponent());
        PublicKey rsaPubKey = (RSAPublicKey) rsaKeyFac.generatePublic(rsaPubKeySpec);

    System.out.println("Key extracted, public part: " + rsaPubKey);
    }

    private static byte[] getFileBytes(String path)
    {
        File f = new File(path);
        int sizecontent = ((int) f.length()); // no key file will ever be bigger than 4GiB...
        byte[] data = new byte[sizecontent];
        try 
            {
            FileInputStream freader = new FileInputStream(f);
            freader.read(data, 0, sizecontent) ;
            freader.close();
            return data;
            }
        catch(IOException ioe)
        {
            System.out.println(ioe.toString());
            return null;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Triple DES is pretty strong, and Oracle likely uses keys with 168 bit of entropy (giving a full 112 bits of security at the time of writing).

Furthermore, although MD5 may not be secure for e.g. signatures, it is certainly valid for use in a key derivation scheme as such as PBE.

Of course it would be a good idea for Oracle to migrate away from these schemes in time, but Triple DES and MD5 should not worry you needlessly. Writing your own is probably a worse idea, there are too many pitfalls.

Choose a good password, it's probably the best thing you can do. Or put your keystore in a correctly configured HSM or smartcard if you want high end security.

share|improve this answer
    
I've been contemplating to review and rewrite the keystore used by Java (adding integrity checks and a better indication if the password is incorrect) but I've been applying cryptography for more than 11 years now. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Aug 8 '12 at 22:00
    
While 3DES is pretty strong and MD5 as key derivation is just as such, it's situation for now, not for what will be in next 10 years (the low end estimate for my application lifetime). MD5 may be broken just as MD4 is tomorrow. It's not like it's a impenetrable hash it once was. Besides, NIST suggest that we should be moving away from SHA1 as a MAC function, let alone MD5... –  Hubert Kario Aug 8 '12 at 22:19
    
True, but if you want us to move away, maybe you are better off creating a protocol, asking the community to review it, implement it and send it to Oracle. This would probably better than creating your own private scheme and hope it survives in the wild. It is the incorrect application of algorithms that is much more dangerous than algorithms that have less than 128 bits of security. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Aug 8 '12 at 22:29
    
I completely agree. I've read my copy of "Practical Crypography" :) That's why I want to use an already used standard, just with different ciphers. Bouncy Castle already has an "UBER" jks key store, but it uses SHA1 and Twofish. I don't think I'll make it insecure just by changing its cipher to AES and SHA-2 (it's literally a change of one String constant). –  Hubert Kario Aug 8 '12 at 22:50
    
Not sure if the Oracle implementation of PBE will run with SHA-2 (it didn't use to), but I guess that would be a sensible aproach. It depends on the rest of the protocol if it adds much security, but I cannot think of a situation where it could make it worse security wise. –  Maarten Bodewes - owlstead Aug 8 '12 at 22:53

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